EX-L 4dr 4x4
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour

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$34,020
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Engine Engine 3.5LV-6
MPG MPG 17 City / 25 Hwy
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2010 Accord Crosstour Overview

2010 Honda Crosstour – Click above for high-res image gallery Its introduction was a case study in how to bungle an automotive social media campaign. Badly. It had people running for thesauruses to find new and fascinating synonyms for "ugly." Its TV campaign has something to do with jazz music and animals. And yet, for all the hubbub, hysterics and lamentations that Honda had completely lost its mind, the 2010 Honda Accord Crosstour quietly showed up and began finding customers. Last month – its best sales performance to date – 2,587 people drove the odd-looking hatchwagon home. Recently, we took delivery of our own Crosstour EX-L tester, loaded-up with all-wheel drive and navigation, to see how we felt about spending a week with Honda's latest experiment. %Gallery-87723% Photos by Drew Phillips / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc. There's no question – none whatsoever – that the Honda Accord Crosstour's styling is controversial to the point of distraction. Some might call it upsetting. Others, however, might like it. Such is the reaction I experienced upon bringing it home. Prior to its arrival, I had essentially characterized the Crosstour as being Medusa on wheels to my better half. She, upon walking outside for a look at the car, returned, looked me in the eye and flatly stated, "That's not ugly. I don't know what your problem is." To some extent, she's right. Not to damn it with faint praise, but from certain angles, the Accord Crosstour is genuinely not bad to look at. It's weird that way. The front three-quarter view actually has a jacked-up sportiness to it, as the fastback roof profile tapers gracefully, and the car's bulbous fanny is hidden from view. From the side, Honda's attempt to grab the Accord Coupe's jaunty visual mojo and apply it to a four-door body (well, five-door, but you get the gist) is plainly evident. And you know, it has some juice to it; there's a muscular shoulder above the rear wheels, and the variety of additional creases and lines in the sheetmetal do their best to break up the big-car monotony. Even the bootylicious tail section works out fairly well in profile, with its subtle little lip spoiler punctuating the roofline's trailing edge. From the rear, the CRX/Insight-style split-glass tail looks pretty decent, as does the pair of polished exhaust tips fitted to our V6-powered tester. What basically kills the look for us is the Crosstour's face, which is unnecessarily overwrought thanks to its cartoonishly large radiator grille, which extends too far below the headlamps and bears no familial resemblance to either the Accord Coupe or Honda's bread-and-butter sedan. If Tim Burton and Michael Bay joined forces to make the Cheshire Cat into a Decepticon, this is what he'd look like. Give Honda credit, though. They sure weren't afraid to take some risks with the styling. Sure, we'd bitch less if it were shaped like a traditional wagon (after all, Honda's served up a couple of tasty-looking ones under the Accord nameplate), …
Full Review

2010 Accord Crosstour Overview

2010 Honda Crosstour – Click above for high-res image gallery Its introduction was a case study in how to bungle an automotive social media campaign. Badly. It had people running for thesauruses to find new and fascinating synonyms for "ugly." Its TV campaign has something to do with jazz music and animals. And yet, for all the hubbub, hysterics and lamentations that Honda had completely lost its mind, the 2010 Honda Accord Crosstour quietly showed up and began finding customers. Last month – its best sales performance to date – 2,587 people drove the odd-looking hatchwagon home. Recently, we took delivery of our own Crosstour EX-L tester, loaded-up with all-wheel drive and navigation, to see how we felt about spending a week with Honda's latest experiment. %Gallery-87723% Photos by Drew Phillips / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc. There's no question – none whatsoever – that the Honda Accord Crosstour's styling is controversial to the point of distraction. Some might call it upsetting. Others, however, might like it. Such is the reaction I experienced upon bringing it home. Prior to its arrival, I had essentially characterized the Crosstour as being Medusa on wheels to my better half. She, upon walking outside for a look at the car, returned, looked me in the eye and flatly stated, "That's not ugly. I don't know what your problem is." To some extent, she's right. Not to damn it with faint praise, but from certain angles, the Accord Crosstour is genuinely not bad to look at. It's weird that way. The front three-quarter view actually has a jacked-up sportiness to it, as the fastback roof profile tapers gracefully, and the car's bulbous fanny is hidden from view. From the side, Honda's attempt to grab the Accord Coupe's jaunty visual mojo and apply it to a four-door body (well, five-door, but you get the gist) is plainly evident. And you know, it has some juice to it; there's a muscular shoulder above the rear wheels, and the variety of additional creases and lines in the sheetmetal do their best to break up the big-car monotony. Even the bootylicious tail section works out fairly well in profile, with its subtle little lip spoiler punctuating the roofline's trailing edge. From the rear, the CRX/Insight-style split-glass tail looks pretty decent, as does the pair of polished exhaust tips fitted to our V6-powered tester. What basically kills the look for us is the Crosstour's face, which is unnecessarily overwrought thanks to its cartoonishly large radiator grille, which extends too far below the headlamps and bears no familial resemblance to either the Accord Coupe or Honda's bread-and-butter sedan. If Tim Burton and Michael Bay joined forces to make the Cheshire Cat into a Decepticon, this is what he'd look like. Give Honda credit, though. They sure weren't afraid to take some risks with the styling. Sure, we'd bitch less if it were shaped like a traditional wagon (after all, Honda's served up a couple of tasty-looking ones under the Accord nameplate), …Hide Full Review