XL Wagon
2010 Ford Transit Connect

MSRP ?

$21,540
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N/A
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Engine Engine 2.0LI-4
MPG MPG 22 City / 25 Hwy
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2010 Transit Connect Overview

2010 Ford Transit Connect – Click above for high-res image gallery If there were one undeniable business lesson to be learned from the auto industry during the past decade, it's to keep a close eye on your sales and a closer eye on your capacity. As Ferrari executives have repeatedly said over the years, the supply of any model should always be exactly one less than the demand. Less supply and you're leaving money on the table, more and you've got unused capacity. This philosophy can be adapted to a wide array of businesses and is especially relevant to small businesses. Many small businesses need to deliver product or services to their customers. For many that operate locally, existing options like the Dodge Sprinter or Ford E-Series vans are simply too large, thirsty and unwieldy for their needs. Enter the Ford Transit Connect. Since being introduced last year in North America, an increasing number of businesses small and large have found the Transit Connect to be just the right size for their needs. We spent a week with a cargo van version to find out what it's like to live with. Follow the jump to read on. %Gallery-92356% Photos by Sam Abuelsamid / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc. The Transit Connect has been a staple of Ford's commercial vehicle fleet in Europe since 2002, but it only joined the U.S. lineup about six months ago. Since that time we've seen more and more of the compact van on the streets. Like the big vans, the Transit Connect has been purpose designed as a commercial vehicle. As a result, its packaging and structure are optimized to accommodate after-market up-fitting with whatever equipment is most appropriate for a given application. For a caterer this could include sliding racks for trays of food or insulated containers. A plumber or electrician might have tool cabinets and drawers full of parts. Unlike some of the panel versions of minivans that have been available over the years, the roof is taller and the sides flatter and more vertical, which makes fitting all of this aftermarket storage hardware easier and more efficient. Perhaps the biggest advantage that the Transit Connect has over the larger offerings is the low floor. The big vans are all rear-wheel-drive body-on-frame designs, which means the load floor is well above the ground in order to clear the drivetrain. The front-wheel-drive Transit Connect has a simple beam axle in the back suspended by leaf springs and a cargo floor that is below the average person's knees. For the intended customer, this is a major convenience as users typically won't have to climb in and out to retrieve tools, parts or trays. Given the primary target market, the Transit Connect's styling – or perhaps lack of styling – shouldn't be a problem. This is a vehicle designed around functional requirements and then wrapped in minimalist sheet metal. Aside from a reshaped lower front fascia that was implemented in time for the U.S. introduction, the …
Full Review

2010 Transit Connect Overview

2010 Ford Transit Connect – Click above for high-res image gallery If there were one undeniable business lesson to be learned from the auto industry during the past decade, it's to keep a close eye on your sales and a closer eye on your capacity. As Ferrari executives have repeatedly said over the years, the supply of any model should always be exactly one less than the demand. Less supply and you're leaving money on the table, more and you've got unused capacity. This philosophy can be adapted to a wide array of businesses and is especially relevant to small businesses. Many small businesses need to deliver product or services to their customers. For many that operate locally, existing options like the Dodge Sprinter or Ford E-Series vans are simply too large, thirsty and unwieldy for their needs. Enter the Ford Transit Connect. Since being introduced last year in North America, an increasing number of businesses small and large have found the Transit Connect to be just the right size for their needs. We spent a week with a cargo van version to find out what it's like to live with. Follow the jump to read on. %Gallery-92356% Photos by Sam Abuelsamid / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc. The Transit Connect has been a staple of Ford's commercial vehicle fleet in Europe since 2002, but it only joined the U.S. lineup about six months ago. Since that time we've seen more and more of the compact van on the streets. Like the big vans, the Transit Connect has been purpose designed as a commercial vehicle. As a result, its packaging and structure are optimized to accommodate after-market up-fitting with whatever equipment is most appropriate for a given application. For a caterer this could include sliding racks for trays of food or insulated containers. A plumber or electrician might have tool cabinets and drawers full of parts. Unlike some of the panel versions of minivans that have been available over the years, the roof is taller and the sides flatter and more vertical, which makes fitting all of this aftermarket storage hardware easier and more efficient. Perhaps the biggest advantage that the Transit Connect has over the larger offerings is the low floor. The big vans are all rear-wheel-drive body-on-frame designs, which means the load floor is well above the ground in order to clear the drivetrain. The front-wheel-drive Transit Connect has a simple beam axle in the back suspended by leaf springs and a cargo floor that is below the average person's knees. For the intended customer, this is a major convenience as users typically won't have to climb in and out to retrieve tools, parts or trays. Given the primary target market, the Transit Connect's styling – or perhaps lack of styling – shouldn't be a problem. This is a vehicle designed around functional requirements and then wrapped in minimalist sheet metal. Aside from a reshaped lower front fascia that was implemented in time for the U.S. introduction, the …Hide Full Review