SE 4dr Front-wheel Drive Sedan
2010 Ford Fusion

MSRP ?

$21,225
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 2.5LI-4
MPG MPG 22 City / 29 Hwy
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2010 Fusion Overview

2010 Ford Fusion SE 6MT – Click above for high-res image gallery What we have here is a rare breed. A mid-size sedan from a domestic automaker equipped with a manually actuated clutch. In fact, the 2010 Ford Fusion (and its rebadged brother, the Mercury Milan) are the last examples offered with Detroit Three nameplates. The Fusion's competition from Chrysler and General Motors are only available with automatic gearboxes, and while the import brands all offer the option to shift-it-yourself, few are actually purchased by stick-averse Americans. So when Ford released its powertrain combinations for the 2010 Fusion, we were surprised to find that not only was a manual available on S and SE four-cylinder models, but the Blue Oval also upgraded ye olde five-speed cog-swapper to a six-speed unit. As fans of the three-pedal arrangement, we promptly requested a manual Fusion to see how it stacks up to the high expectations set by the V6-powered 2010 Fusion Sport we've already reviewed. %Gallery-49155% Photos Copyright ©2009 Sam Abuelsamid / Weblogs, Inc. As our regular readers and podcast listeners are aware, a large cross-section of the editorial staff are fans of the Ford Fusion. For a reasonable price you can pick up a decently equipped, nicely sized, attractive sedan that can accommodate a family of four in comfort, yet still be fun to drive. Most of us like the 2010 Fusion's exterior and interior updates, and for those that want something more visually sedate, Ford continues to offer the Milan through Mercury dealers. Here at Autoblog's Ypsilanti, MI office, we like a bit of bold mixed in with our daily drivers. Just because you are schlepping the kids to school or commuting to work doesn't mean you have to be invisible. With the most aggressive iteration of the three bar grille motif, the new Fusion is far from subdued. Our tester was a mid-level SE model equipped with the new 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine that debuted last year in the Escape. This was paired with a new six-speed manual transmission currently unavailable in any other North American market Ford, although we wouldn't be surprised to find that it winds up in the Focus and possibly the Fiesta. With 175 horsepower and 172 lb-ft of torque, the four-cylinder Fusion is hardly a sports sedan, but that doesn't mean it's not a fun drive. With a comparatively modest (by modern standards) mass of 3,285 pounds, the four banger is more than adequate for daily commuting duties. And as the week progressed, we came to think of our Fusion as a riff on the sort of lightweight sport sedan you don't see anymore – the kind that didn't need massive amounts of power and kit to be thoroughly entertaining and quick to respond on twisty roads. If the span between your house and work-place includes stretches of winding tarmac, the manual-equipped Fusion could be just what you're looking for. The clutch pedal is smooth and progressive, and one of the advantages of limited output …
Full Review

2010 Fusion Overview

2010 Ford Fusion SE 6MT – Click above for high-res image gallery What we have here is a rare breed. A mid-size sedan from a domestic automaker equipped with a manually actuated clutch. In fact, the 2010 Ford Fusion (and its rebadged brother, the Mercury Milan) are the last examples offered with Detroit Three nameplates. The Fusion's competition from Chrysler and General Motors are only available with automatic gearboxes, and while the import brands all offer the option to shift-it-yourself, few are actually purchased by stick-averse Americans. So when Ford released its powertrain combinations for the 2010 Fusion, we were surprised to find that not only was a manual available on S and SE four-cylinder models, but the Blue Oval also upgraded ye olde five-speed cog-swapper to a six-speed unit. As fans of the three-pedal arrangement, we promptly requested a manual Fusion to see how it stacks up to the high expectations set by the V6-powered 2010 Fusion Sport we've already reviewed. %Gallery-49155% Photos Copyright ©2009 Sam Abuelsamid / Weblogs, Inc. As our regular readers and podcast listeners are aware, a large cross-section of the editorial staff are fans of the Ford Fusion. For a reasonable price you can pick up a decently equipped, nicely sized, attractive sedan that can accommodate a family of four in comfort, yet still be fun to drive. Most of us like the 2010 Fusion's exterior and interior updates, and for those that want something more visually sedate, Ford continues to offer the Milan through Mercury dealers. Here at Autoblog's Ypsilanti, MI office, we like a bit of bold mixed in with our daily drivers. Just because you are schlepping the kids to school or commuting to work doesn't mean you have to be invisible. With the most aggressive iteration of the three bar grille motif, the new Fusion is far from subdued. Our tester was a mid-level SE model equipped with the new 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine that debuted last year in the Escape. This was paired with a new six-speed manual transmission currently unavailable in any other North American market Ford, although we wouldn't be surprised to find that it winds up in the Focus and possibly the Fiesta. With 175 horsepower and 172 lb-ft of torque, the four-cylinder Fusion is hardly a sports sedan, but that doesn't mean it's not a fun drive. With a comparatively modest (by modern standards) mass of 3,285 pounds, the four banger is more than adequate for daily commuting duties. And as the week progressed, we came to think of our Fusion as a riff on the sort of lightweight sport sedan you don't see anymore – the kind that didn't need massive amounts of power and kit to be thoroughly entertaining and quick to respond on twisty roads. If the span between your house and work-place includes stretches of winding tarmac, the manual-equipped Fusion could be just what you're looking for. The clutch pedal is smooth and progressive, and one of the advantages of limited output …Hide Full Review