Base 4dr Front-wheel Drive Sedan
2010 Ford Fusion Hybrid

MSRP ?

$27,950
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Engine Engine 2.5LI-4
MPG MPG 41 City / 36 Hwy
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2010 Fusion Hybrid Overview

2010 Ford Fusion Hybrid – Click above for high-res image gallery Recently, we had our third opportunity to drive the 2010 Ford Fusion Hybrid. Actually, the last go around was with a Mercury Milan Hybrid, but aside from a different nose and fanny, it is the same car. Even though we did a full review of the Milan, we asked Ford for another go around because of the difference in fuel efficiency compared to the first drive we did last December in California. We managed to achieve 43.1 mpg driving around Hollywood, beating the EPA city rating of 41. But back home in Michigan, a week of driving around Ann Arbor yielded only 29.4 mpg with the first several days actually barely managing to crack 27 mpg. Why the big drop? It wasn't that we drove the Milan like a race car, although the Fusion and Milan do have some very nice dynamic properties. No, this was all about climate. While the temperatures in Hollywood were a very temperate mid-70s in December, six weeks later in Michigan, we were barely breaking out of the teens with overnight and early morning temps in the single-digit range. What we're about to say is heresy to the hybrid true believers, but hybrids are not the best solution for every driving condition. Find out why after the jump. %Gallery-70469% Photos copyright ©2009 Sam Abuelsamid / Weblogs, Inc. We've had the opportunity to drive a number of different hybrids over the last several years and, without fail, when driven in winter conditions, the mileage significantly degrades compared to summer motoring. Naturally, all vehicles perform worse when the mercury drops precipitously, but this seems to be particularly true of hybrid vehicles. The problem is that hybrids (at least strong hybrids like those from Ford and Toyota) rely heavily on their electric drive systems for their efficiency improvements over equivalent conventional vehicles. Anyone who has ever left a laptop, phone or camera in a car parked outside overnight during winter has discovered that electrochemical batteries (at least the ones we have today) don't perform very well when temps drop below freezing. The same is true for hybrid batteries. Nickel metal hydride batteries used in hybrids are reluctant to let electrons flow at temps much below the mid-30s. That means that a Fusion Hybrid that starts silently when you turn the key in July immediately fires up the engine when the temperature is 10 degrees. Modern engines rely on catalytic converters to transform many of the pollutants they produce into harmless gases. The problem is that the catalyst is all but ineffective until it warms up. As a result, most pollutants produced by engines are released during the first few minutes of operation after a cold start. Once the catalyst is ready, upwards of 99 percent of pollutants are eliminated. Thus, when the engine starts in a hybrid, the electronic management system is programmed to keep it running until the catalyst is warmed up enough to be …
Full Review

2010 Fusion Hybrid Overview

2010 Ford Fusion Hybrid – Click above for high-res image gallery Recently, we had our third opportunity to drive the 2010 Ford Fusion Hybrid. Actually, the last go around was with a Mercury Milan Hybrid, but aside from a different nose and fanny, it is the same car. Even though we did a full review of the Milan, we asked Ford for another go around because of the difference in fuel efficiency compared to the first drive we did last December in California. We managed to achieve 43.1 mpg driving around Hollywood, beating the EPA city rating of 41. But back home in Michigan, a week of driving around Ann Arbor yielded only 29.4 mpg with the first several days actually barely managing to crack 27 mpg. Why the big drop? It wasn't that we drove the Milan like a race car, although the Fusion and Milan do have some very nice dynamic properties. No, this was all about climate. While the temperatures in Hollywood were a very temperate mid-70s in December, six weeks later in Michigan, we were barely breaking out of the teens with overnight and early morning temps in the single-digit range. What we're about to say is heresy to the hybrid true believers, but hybrids are not the best solution for every driving condition. Find out why after the jump. %Gallery-70469% Photos copyright ©2009 Sam Abuelsamid / Weblogs, Inc. We've had the opportunity to drive a number of different hybrids over the last several years and, without fail, when driven in winter conditions, the mileage significantly degrades compared to summer motoring. Naturally, all vehicles perform worse when the mercury drops precipitously, but this seems to be particularly true of hybrid vehicles. The problem is that hybrids (at least strong hybrids like those from Ford and Toyota) rely heavily on their electric drive systems for their efficiency improvements over equivalent conventional vehicles. Anyone who has ever left a laptop, phone or camera in a car parked outside overnight during winter has discovered that electrochemical batteries (at least the ones we have today) don't perform very well when temps drop below freezing. The same is true for hybrid batteries. Nickel metal hydride batteries used in hybrids are reluctant to let electrons flow at temps much below the mid-30s. That means that a Fusion Hybrid that starts silently when you turn the key in July immediately fires up the engine when the temperature is 10 degrees. Modern engines rely on catalytic converters to transform many of the pollutants they produce into harmless gases. The problem is that the catalyst is all but ineffective until it warms up. As a result, most pollutants produced by engines are released during the first few minutes of operation after a cold start. Once the catalyst is ready, upwards of 99 percent of pollutants are eliminated. Thus, when the engine starts in a hybrid, the electronic management system is programmed to keep it running until the catalyst is warmed up enough to be …Hide Full Review