Turbo Premium 4dr All-wheel Drive
2010 Cadillac SRX

MSRP ?

$51,860
Quick Quote

Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
Hassle Free Quote
Engine Engine 2.8LV-6
MPG MPG 15 City / 22 Hwy
More More View All Specs

2010 SRX Overview

2010 Cadillac SRX 2.8T - Click above for a high-res image gallery Last month, we sampled the 2010 Cadillac SRX in naturally aspirated, 265-horsepower guise, and after a week behind the wheel we are convinced General Motors' luxury brand finally has a competitive crossover to take on the segment-defining Lexus RX. Along with Cadillac's unique angular styling and a full complement of amenities, the SRX surprised us with an edgy chassis that wasn't afraid to cut the rug when pulled onto the dance floor. But while the SRX has some moves, the direct injected 3.0-liter V6 isn't exactly Fred Astaire. It provides just enough motivation for daily driving, but for customers that need more – particularly for those who want to fully enjoy the SRX's underpinnings – Cadillac has decided to offer a second, more aggressive engine to the mix. But with 300 horsepower, the 2010 SRX 2.8T – the first production Cadillac in the US fitted with a turbocharger – aims to please buyers looking for more pop in the pedal... a bit more skip in their step. Does the boosted Caddy deliver? We went to the Milford Proving Grounds to find out. %Gallery-69552% While Cadillac has high expectations for the sporting performance of the SRX 2.8T, its sales goals are far more modest. Cadillac expects only 10% to 15% of SRX buyers to opt for the turbocharged version, and those that do will pay a premium for its increased capabilities. The 2.8T option will only be available in Performance and Premium trim, and all-wheel drive, moonroof and navigation are all standard. The turbo'd SRX utilizes the same FE3 suspension found in uplevel 3.0-liter models, though it has its own Aisin-Warner six-speed automatic transmission. We'd estimate the 2.8T's extra power will yield a 0-60 time of 7.5 seconds; about a second faster than the 3.0-liter model. Even with the 2.8T's improved performance, Cadillac still expects similar fuel economy to the 17/23 numbers of the non-turbo 3.0-liter mill, with city/highway numbers of 16/23. Although final pricing hasn't been announced, Cadillac tells us the 2.8T will carry a $3,000 premium versus a similarly equipped 3.0-liter model, so the MSRP is likely to max-out around $53,000 if all the boxes are checked. Normally, when we get an invite from The General to test one of its more subdued offerings, we're relegated to a test track normally used to evaluate suspension setup, NVH (noise, vibration and harshness) and general driveability. With the SRX 2.8T, we received a bit of a surprise. Instead, we were escorted to the Chevrolet Corvette ZR1's stomping grounds, affectionately referred to as the "Lutz 'Ring." Bob Lutz' signature track takes cues from some of the world's most impressive circuits, combining hairpin turns, significant elevation changes, blind crests and aggressive straightaways into a course designed to test the mettle of GM's high performance offerings. A select group of test drivers are qualified to attack the track at full throttle, and the training regimen requires pilots to cut their teeth …
Full Review

2010 SRX Overview

2010 Cadillac SRX 2.8T - Click above for a high-res image gallery Last month, we sampled the 2010 Cadillac SRX in naturally aspirated, 265-horsepower guise, and after a week behind the wheel we are convinced General Motors' luxury brand finally has a competitive crossover to take on the segment-defining Lexus RX. Along with Cadillac's unique angular styling and a full complement of amenities, the SRX surprised us with an edgy chassis that wasn't afraid to cut the rug when pulled onto the dance floor. But while the SRX has some moves, the direct injected 3.0-liter V6 isn't exactly Fred Astaire. It provides just enough motivation for daily driving, but for customers that need more – particularly for those who want to fully enjoy the SRX's underpinnings – Cadillac has decided to offer a second, more aggressive engine to the mix. But with 300 horsepower, the 2010 SRX 2.8T – the first production Cadillac in the US fitted with a turbocharger – aims to please buyers looking for more pop in the pedal... a bit more skip in their step. Does the boosted Caddy deliver? We went to the Milford Proving Grounds to find out. %Gallery-69552% While Cadillac has high expectations for the sporting performance of the SRX 2.8T, its sales goals are far more modest. Cadillac expects only 10% to 15% of SRX buyers to opt for the turbocharged version, and those that do will pay a premium for its increased capabilities. The 2.8T option will only be available in Performance and Premium trim, and all-wheel drive, moonroof and navigation are all standard. The turbo'd SRX utilizes the same FE3 suspension found in uplevel 3.0-liter models, though it has its own Aisin-Warner six-speed automatic transmission. We'd estimate the 2.8T's extra power will yield a 0-60 time of 7.5 seconds; about a second faster than the 3.0-liter model. Even with the 2.8T's improved performance, Cadillac still expects similar fuel economy to the 17/23 numbers of the non-turbo 3.0-liter mill, with city/highway numbers of 16/23. Although final pricing hasn't been announced, Cadillac tells us the 2.8T will carry a $3,000 premium versus a similarly equipped 3.0-liter model, so the MSRP is likely to max-out around $53,000 if all the boxes are checked. Normally, when we get an invite from The General to test one of its more subdued offerings, we're relegated to a test track normally used to evaluate suspension setup, NVH (noise, vibration and harshness) and general driveability. With the SRX 2.8T, we received a bit of a surprise. Instead, we were escorted to the Chevrolet Corvette ZR1's stomping grounds, affectionately referred to as the "Lutz 'Ring." Bob Lutz' signature track takes cues from some of the world's most impressive circuits, combining hairpin turns, significant elevation changes, blind crests and aggressive straightaways into a course designed to test the mettle of GM's high performance offerings. A select group of test drivers are qualified to attack the track at full throttle, and the training regimen requires pilots to cut their teeth …Hide Full Review