3.7L 4dr All-wheel Drive
2010 Acura MDX

MSRP ?

$42,230
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Engine Engine 3.7LV-6
MPG MPG 16 City / 21 Hwy
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2010 MDX Overview

Overcomes Corporate Snout with Luxury, Technology and Value To Spare 2010 Acura MDX - Click above for high-res image gallery "Any press is good press," so the saying goes. With that in mind, the refreshed 2010 Acura MDX, now bearing the automaker's corporate "beak," should finally be garnering some much-needed attention. And the Acura MDX deserves the spotlight. Nearing its tenth year of production, the seven-passenger crossover has flown under the radar, always relegated to yesterday's news as the segment rapidly expanded and welcomed interesting new competitors. Seemingly tired of watching the competition steal the conversation, Acura threw on the controversial grille and significantly updated the MDX for 2010. We spent a week with Acura's big SUV. Pressed into family service, we put nearly 900 miles on our tester, including a one-day, 12-hour journey and more than a few trips with a full load of passengers. While nearly everyone mentioned its questionable front fascia during the walk-around, we wondered if the Acura's on-road performance and luxury amenities were strong enough to convince us to look the other way. Follow the jump to find out... %Gallery-99133% Photos copyright ©2010 Michael Harley / AOL Fifteen years ago, feeling obligated to answer a new threat from Infiniti and Lexus, Acura introduced the world to its first sport utility vehicle. While Infiniti and Lexus both had models in the corporate family to lean on (the Infiniti QX4 was a rebadged Nissan Pathfinder, while the Lexus LX 450 was a rebadged Toyota Land Cruiser), Acura had an empty garage. Undeterred, the automaker partnered with Isuzu and reworked the rugged body-on-frame Trooper as the "all-new" Acura SLX in 1996. Bad press (Consumer Reports rated it "Not Acceptable" after discovering the SLX's tendency to roll during emergency maneuvers), lousy performance and an overall unappealing appearance doomed it from the start. The Acura SLX was sold for just four years before it was discontinued after the 1999 model year. After a year without offering a high-riding wagon, Acura launched its first home-grown crossover – renamed the MDX – in 2001. While Infiniti and Lexus continued to offer brawny and capable truck-based SUVs, Acura's newest seven-passenger model shared platforms with the Honda Odyssey minivan and the Honda Accord sedan. Unlike the rugged truck-like competition, the unibody constructed MDX featured a transverse-mounted 3.5-liter V6, a five-speed automatic transmission and an all-wheel-drive system based on front-wheel-drive running gear. The second-generation Acura MDX debuted for the 2007 model year. Completely redesigned and larger in every dimension than its predecessor, the new seven-passenger CUV shared architecture with the Honda Pilot and Honda Ridgeline pickup – both unibody front-wheel-drive platforms. While the Ridgeline featured Honda's "VTM-4" AWD, the upscale MDX was fitted with Honda's performance-oriented "Super Handling All-Wheel Drive" (SH-AWD), powered by an upgraded 3.7-liter six-cylinder running through a five-speed automatic transmission. Acura made several big changes to its flagship SUV for 2010. Most visibly, the MDX received a facelift to align its appearance with the rest of its siblings. Under the hood …
Full Review

2010 MDX Overview

Overcomes Corporate Snout with Luxury, Technology and Value To Spare 2010 Acura MDX - Click above for high-res image gallery "Any press is good press," so the saying goes. With that in mind, the refreshed 2010 Acura MDX, now bearing the automaker's corporate "beak," should finally be garnering some much-needed attention. And the Acura MDX deserves the spotlight. Nearing its tenth year of production, the seven-passenger crossover has flown under the radar, always relegated to yesterday's news as the segment rapidly expanded and welcomed interesting new competitors. Seemingly tired of watching the competition steal the conversation, Acura threw on the controversial grille and significantly updated the MDX for 2010. We spent a week with Acura's big SUV. Pressed into family service, we put nearly 900 miles on our tester, including a one-day, 12-hour journey and more than a few trips with a full load of passengers. While nearly everyone mentioned its questionable front fascia during the walk-around, we wondered if the Acura's on-road performance and luxury amenities were strong enough to convince us to look the other way. Follow the jump to find out... %Gallery-99133% Photos copyright ©2010 Michael Harley / AOL Fifteen years ago, feeling obligated to answer a new threat from Infiniti and Lexus, Acura introduced the world to its first sport utility vehicle. While Infiniti and Lexus both had models in the corporate family to lean on (the Infiniti QX4 was a rebadged Nissan Pathfinder, while the Lexus LX 450 was a rebadged Toyota Land Cruiser), Acura had an empty garage. Undeterred, the automaker partnered with Isuzu and reworked the rugged body-on-frame Trooper as the "all-new" Acura SLX in 1996. Bad press (Consumer Reports rated it "Not Acceptable" after discovering the SLX's tendency to roll during emergency maneuvers), lousy performance and an overall unappealing appearance doomed it from the start. The Acura SLX was sold for just four years before it was discontinued after the 1999 model year. After a year without offering a high-riding wagon, Acura launched its first home-grown crossover – renamed the MDX – in 2001. While Infiniti and Lexus continued to offer brawny and capable truck-based SUVs, Acura's newest seven-passenger model shared platforms with the Honda Odyssey minivan and the Honda Accord sedan. Unlike the rugged truck-like competition, the unibody constructed MDX featured a transverse-mounted 3.5-liter V6, a five-speed automatic transmission and an all-wheel-drive system based on front-wheel-drive running gear. The second-generation Acura MDX debuted for the 2007 model year. Completely redesigned and larger in every dimension than its predecessor, the new seven-passenger CUV shared architecture with the Honda Pilot and Honda Ridgeline pickup – both unibody front-wheel-drive platforms. While the Ridgeline featured Honda's "VTM-4" AWD, the upscale MDX was fitted with Honda's performance-oriented "Super Handling All-Wheel Drive" (SH-AWD), powered by an upgraded 3.7-liter six-cylinder running through a five-speed automatic transmission. Acura made several big changes to its flagship SUV for 2010. Most visibly, the MDX received a facelift to align its appearance with the rest of its siblings. Under the hood …Hide Full Review