2009 Volkswagen CC

MSRP ?

$27,100 - $39,800
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 2.0LI-4
MPG MPG 21 City / 31 Hwy
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2009 CC Overview

2009 Volkswagen CC Sport – Click above for high-res image gallery We still cringe upon hearing marketing types utter the phrase "four-door coupe." It's inherently a lie, a scam. Who are they trying to fool? It's not a four-door coupe, it's a sedan with a sloping roof – generally one that's missing a middle rear-seat. And there's nothing wrong with that. But, just like automakers the world 'round bend over backwards corrupting the language to avoid calling a station wagon anything but a station wagon (Sportback, Avant, Sportcombi, etc.), the oxymoronic four-door coupe appears to be here to stay. Where's George Carlin when you need him? With that rant out of the way, the 2009 Volkswagen CC is the best four-door coupe we've ever driven – at least this side of a Mercedes-Benz CLS63 AMG, which is three times the price. %Gallery-71169% Photos copyright ©2009 Drew Phillips / Weblogs, Inc. Good looking isn't even the right word for VW's rebodied Passat. Handsome, exquisite, sharp, revolutionary and awesome all spring to mind. But, let's just settle on two: segment busting. Not only that, but the CC renders the current Passat about as desirable as a late-model Ford Five Hundred. Which is to say, not at all. In fact, with the exception of third rear-seat, we can't think of a single reason to choose a Passat over the CC. Not one. Price? You want to argue price? Okay – the Passat starts at $28,300. The CC? $27,100. And the CC gets better gas mileage, too. So your total costs ought to be less. How's that possible? Probably because of improved aerodynamics, as the Passat is only 44 pounds heavier than the CC we tested. Of course, both cars have identical wheelbases and widths, though the CC is half an inch longer. Our tester had but one $375 option (Sirius) and a $750 destination charge, bringing the total to $28,225 – $75 less than a Passat. To summarize, buy the CC. The interior's better, too. In fact, this is one of our favorite cabins currently on the market. It has the 'no compromise' character found in Piech-mandated VWs like the Phaeton and O.G. Touareg, though the absolute quality of the materials has been taken down a shelf or two. Still, imagine the haptic quality of an Audi without all the fussy, cluttered and oddly placed buttons. That's how VeeDub laid out the CC's controls. Props are given for the two-tone dash layout (in this case black and tan), which is a wonderful change of pace from the usual Germanic black-as-my-soul theme. Special praise is reserved for the two-tone, pleated leather seats – all four of them. The quad thrones conspire with the overall roominess to make the cabin an excellent place to spend some time. Yes, if you're tall you'll want to sit up front as the sloping roof cuts into your headroom, though we placed a six-foot, four-inch guy back there and he only complained once. And we haven't even gotten …
Full Review

2009 CC Overview

2009 Volkswagen CC Sport – Click above for high-res image gallery We still cringe upon hearing marketing types utter the phrase "four-door coupe." It's inherently a lie, a scam. Who are they trying to fool? It's not a four-door coupe, it's a sedan with a sloping roof – generally one that's missing a middle rear-seat. And there's nothing wrong with that. But, just like automakers the world 'round bend over backwards corrupting the language to avoid calling a station wagon anything but a station wagon (Sportback, Avant, Sportcombi, etc.), the oxymoronic four-door coupe appears to be here to stay. Where's George Carlin when you need him? With that rant out of the way, the 2009 Volkswagen CC is the best four-door coupe we've ever driven – at least this side of a Mercedes-Benz CLS63 AMG, which is three times the price. %Gallery-71169% Photos copyright ©2009 Drew Phillips / Weblogs, Inc. Good looking isn't even the right word for VW's rebodied Passat. Handsome, exquisite, sharp, revolutionary and awesome all spring to mind. But, let's just settle on two: segment busting. Not only that, but the CC renders the current Passat about as desirable as a late-model Ford Five Hundred. Which is to say, not at all. In fact, with the exception of third rear-seat, we can't think of a single reason to choose a Passat over the CC. Not one. Price? You want to argue price? Okay – the Passat starts at $28,300. The CC? $27,100. And the CC gets better gas mileage, too. So your total costs ought to be less. How's that possible? Probably because of improved aerodynamics, as the Passat is only 44 pounds heavier than the CC we tested. Of course, both cars have identical wheelbases and widths, though the CC is half an inch longer. Our tester had but one $375 option (Sirius) and a $750 destination charge, bringing the total to $28,225 – $75 less than a Passat. To summarize, buy the CC. The interior's better, too. In fact, this is one of our favorite cabins currently on the market. It has the 'no compromise' character found in Piech-mandated VWs like the Phaeton and O.G. Touareg, though the absolute quality of the materials has been taken down a shelf or two. Still, imagine the haptic quality of an Audi without all the fussy, cluttered and oddly placed buttons. That's how VeeDub laid out the CC's controls. Props are given for the two-tone dash layout (in this case black and tan), which is a wonderful change of pace from the usual Germanic black-as-my-soul theme. Special praise is reserved for the two-tone, pleated leather seats – all four of them. The quad thrones conspire with the overall roominess to make the cabin an excellent place to spend some time. Yes, if you're tall you'll want to sit up front as the sloping roof cuts into your headroom, though we placed a six-foot, four-inch guy back there and he only complained once. And we haven't even gotten …Hide Full Review