Base 4dr Front-wheel Drive
2009 Toyota Venza

MSRP ?

$25,975
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Engine Engine 2.7LI-4
MPG MPG 21 City / 29 Hwy
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2009 Venza Overview

2009 Toyota Venza – Click above for high-res image gallery Earlier this spring, our own Alex Nunez reviewed Toyota's latest crossover type thingy, the Venza, and came away rather impressed. I do a fair bit of traveling for my day job, which usually entails schlepping a sizable amount of video equipment around. Typically we pack up our A/V gear and FedEx it to a location since airlines charge so much for extra baggage and won't guarantee arrival times. For one of our recent trips, however, we decided to hit the road and venture from our Ann Arbor offices down to western South Carolina. As it happened, a Venza was available for duty and appeared to be well-suited to the task at hand. We loaded up cameras, tripods, microphones and other miscellanea before heading due south on US-23 for Ohio and parts beyond. Our Venza was finished in a unique Sunset Bronze Mica color with the same ivory leather interior that we sampled previously. Under the hood was also the same 3.5-liter V6 engine that we've enjoyed in numerous Lexus and Toyota vehicles with torque going to all four wheels via Toyota's all-wheel-drive system. As Nunez described, the Venza doesn't really fit in the typical crossover category because it's taller than a typical wagon yet shorter than vehicles like the Ford Edge or Chevrolet Equinox. It's more like a tall Camry wagon than anything else – which, at least in theory – is just ducky by us. Find out how the Venza fared on our road trip odyssey after the jump. %Gallery-80875% Photos by Sam Abuelsamid / Copyright ©2009 Weblogs, Inc. As a jacked-up wagon, the Venza features similar elevated seating to what you would find in a Ford Flex or Lincoln MKT, but not as high as in Toyota's own Highlander or a Chevrolet Traverse. That makes getting in and out of the Venza easy, without a perceptible step up or drop down to negotiate. The shape of the seats also aids ingress and egress because the squabs are relatively flat. Unfortunately, this also means they provide minimal lateral support – something that would prove to be a problem. In spite of having an inflatable lumbar support and power adjustments for height and backrest angle, we didn't find the Venza's thrones to be very comfortable or supportive over the long haul. In fact, after only about an hour on the road, we were continuously adjusting our seating positions to alleviate irritation on our spines. I've been on numerous cross-country excursions before and don't have a bad back, yet still wound up feeling sore after several hours on the road, which was an uncomfortable first. It's particularly unfortunate the seats are so inhospitable because many other elements of the Venza are so good. As we moved south into the hills and mountains of Kentucky and Tennessee, the Venza's 268-horsepower V6 never felt strained and its six-speed automatic transmission was a model of certainty, never hunting around for the right ratio. …
Full Review

2009 Venza Overview

2009 Toyota Venza – Click above for high-res image gallery Earlier this spring, our own Alex Nunez reviewed Toyota's latest crossover type thingy, the Venza, and came away rather impressed. I do a fair bit of traveling for my day job, which usually entails schlepping a sizable amount of video equipment around. Typically we pack up our A/V gear and FedEx it to a location since airlines charge so much for extra baggage and won't guarantee arrival times. For one of our recent trips, however, we decided to hit the road and venture from our Ann Arbor offices down to western South Carolina. As it happened, a Venza was available for duty and appeared to be well-suited to the task at hand. We loaded up cameras, tripods, microphones and other miscellanea before heading due south on US-23 for Ohio and parts beyond. Our Venza was finished in a unique Sunset Bronze Mica color with the same ivory leather interior that we sampled previously. Under the hood was also the same 3.5-liter V6 engine that we've enjoyed in numerous Lexus and Toyota vehicles with torque going to all four wheels via Toyota's all-wheel-drive system. As Nunez described, the Venza doesn't really fit in the typical crossover category because it's taller than a typical wagon yet shorter than vehicles like the Ford Edge or Chevrolet Equinox. It's more like a tall Camry wagon than anything else – which, at least in theory – is just ducky by us. Find out how the Venza fared on our road trip odyssey after the jump. %Gallery-80875% Photos by Sam Abuelsamid / Copyright ©2009 Weblogs, Inc. As a jacked-up wagon, the Venza features similar elevated seating to what you would find in a Ford Flex or Lincoln MKT, but not as high as in Toyota's own Highlander or a Chevrolet Traverse. That makes getting in and out of the Venza easy, without a perceptible step up or drop down to negotiate. The shape of the seats also aids ingress and egress because the squabs are relatively flat. Unfortunately, this also means they provide minimal lateral support – something that would prove to be a problem. In spite of having an inflatable lumbar support and power adjustments for height and backrest angle, we didn't find the Venza's thrones to be very comfortable or supportive over the long haul. In fact, after only about an hour on the road, we were continuously adjusting our seating positions to alleviate irritation on our spines. I've been on numerous cross-country excursions before and don't have a bad back, yet still wound up feeling sore after several hours on the road, which was an uncomfortable first. It's particularly unfortunate the seats are so inhospitable because many other elements of the Venza are so good. As we moved south into the hills and mountains of Kentucky and Tennessee, the Venza's 268-horsepower V6 never felt strained and its six-speed automatic transmission was a model of certainty, never hunting around for the right ratio. …Hide Full Review