2009 Nissan Maxima

MSRP ?

$30,160 - $32,860
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Engine Engine 3.5LV-6
MPG MPG 19 City / 26 Hwy
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2009 Maxima Overview

2009 Nissan Maxima - Click above for high-res image gallery Once upon a time, labeling anything other than a two-door, two-seater a "sports car" would have been anathema to enthusiasts. And calling a mid-size sedan by the same name would have been utterly absurd. But when Nissan originally slapped the 4DSC ("four-door sports car") label on the Maxima 20 years ago, the automotive landscape was a very different place. Today, the sports sedan has been embraced by the masses, and with a series of "four-door coupes" hitting the market, consumers looking for an entertaining ride with seating for four have a host of options to choose from. So when Nissan trotted out the all-new 2009 Maxima in New York last year and revived the 4DSC label, the automaker's past successes weighed heavily on the redesigned sedan. Would it still deliver the power and handling of its predecessors or would it be just another poseur in a see of wannabe sports sedans? More to the point: is this really a sports car? Let's find out. %Gallery-50113% Photos Copyright ©2009 Sam Abuelsamid / Weblogs, Inc. Nissan has always had a sporting streak running through its DNA. What began with the Datsun 240Z and 510 has evolved into 370Z, GT-R and, yes, even the Maxima. When the latest edition of the brand's flagship sedan debuted a year ago, it introduced a new design language dubbed "liquid motion." The theme was a complete departure from the sharp creases and relatively slab sides of the previous generation model, beginning with the headlights that form a stylized "L," a cue that has since been carried over to the new Z. Another element of the new design theme which first appeared on Nissan's 2008 Forum minivan concept is the hood profile. A pair of ridges run from the grille ends to the A-pillars with the top crease chamfered at the edge. The ridges flank a wave that runs from end to end, providing visual interest both from the outside as well as the driver's seat. All four fenders swell outward, creating prominent shoulders rife with muscularity. The roofline has a fastback profile that contributes to the sedan's sporting character, but stays elevated long enough to ensure decent rear head-room before falling away. The Maxima's styling has a lot to like, but there are some questionable details. From where we sit, the weakest styling element is the front fascia and the grille housed within. From certain angles, the nose looks too low and too heavy, with alarming amounts of overhang – and the same issue carries over to the rear. In both cases, a contributing factor may be the revised proportions that come from the two-inch shorter wheelbase compared to the 2008 model, along with a four-inch shorter overall length. Inside, the Maxima is a curious mix of premium and cheap. The shapes and textures have attractive colors and textures, but aside from the top of the dash, the rest of the surfaces surrounding the driver are …
Full Review

2009 Maxima Overview

2009 Nissan Maxima - Click above for high-res image gallery Once upon a time, labeling anything other than a two-door, two-seater a "sports car" would have been anathema to enthusiasts. And calling a mid-size sedan by the same name would have been utterly absurd. But when Nissan originally slapped the 4DSC ("four-door sports car") label on the Maxima 20 years ago, the automotive landscape was a very different place. Today, the sports sedan has been embraced by the masses, and with a series of "four-door coupes" hitting the market, consumers looking for an entertaining ride with seating for four have a host of options to choose from. So when Nissan trotted out the all-new 2009 Maxima in New York last year and revived the 4DSC label, the automaker's past successes weighed heavily on the redesigned sedan. Would it still deliver the power and handling of its predecessors or would it be just another poseur in a see of wannabe sports sedans? More to the point: is this really a sports car? Let's find out. %Gallery-50113% Photos Copyright ©2009 Sam Abuelsamid / Weblogs, Inc. Nissan has always had a sporting streak running through its DNA. What began with the Datsun 240Z and 510 has evolved into 370Z, GT-R and, yes, even the Maxima. When the latest edition of the brand's flagship sedan debuted a year ago, it introduced a new design language dubbed "liquid motion." The theme was a complete departure from the sharp creases and relatively slab sides of the previous generation model, beginning with the headlights that form a stylized "L," a cue that has since been carried over to the new Z. Another element of the new design theme which first appeared on Nissan's 2008 Forum minivan concept is the hood profile. A pair of ridges run from the grille ends to the A-pillars with the top crease chamfered at the edge. The ridges flank a wave that runs from end to end, providing visual interest both from the outside as well as the driver's seat. All four fenders swell outward, creating prominent shoulders rife with muscularity. The roofline has a fastback profile that contributes to the sedan's sporting character, but stays elevated long enough to ensure decent rear head-room before falling away. The Maxima's styling has a lot to like, but there are some questionable details. From where we sit, the weakest styling element is the front fascia and the grille housed within. From certain angles, the nose looks too low and too heavy, with alarming amounts of overhang – and the same issue carries over to the rear. In both cases, a contributing factor may be the revised proportions that come from the two-inch shorter wheelbase compared to the 2008 model, along with a four-inch shorter overall length. Inside, the Maxima is a curious mix of premium and cheap. The shapes and textures have attractive colors and textures, but aside from the top of the dash, the rest of the surfaces surrounding the driver are …Hide Full Review