2009 Nissan 370Z

MSRP ?

$29,930 - $39,130
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Engine Engine 3.7LV-6
MPG MPG 18 City / 26 Hwy
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2009 370Z Overview

2009 Nissan 370Z - Click above for high-res gallery The first Datsun 240Z rolled into American showrooms in 1969. Four decades later, we've got our hands wrapped around the thick, leather, multi-function steering wheel of its direct descendant, the all-new 370Z. With a 332 hp V6 and a six-speed manual transmission directing power to the rear wheels, our outlook is decidedly positive as we head out on the street (our First Drive on the track was back in December). Is all of the hype surrounding this new coupe justified? How does it compare to the GT-R? Just how did the all-new Z-car fare after a week in our garage? Find out after the jump... Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE %Gallery-47190% Photos copyright ©2009 Drew Phillips / Weblogs, Inc. Our test model had been plunged in a bath of Monterey Blue paint at the Tochigi, Japan production facility and with a tint of metallic in its reflection, the all-new for 2009 coupe looks stunning with its shorter wheelbase and wide stance. Still instantly recognized as a "Z," the aluminum and steel sheet metal is wrapped aggressively around Nissan's "front midships" (FM) platform, shared with the Infiniti FX and G37 family. From the toothed front grille to the flared rear fenders, the styling leaves little doubt about its intended sports car mission. With more than a passing resemblance to the Nissan GT-R, the 370Z lures stares and thumbs-up from pedestrians, and stoplight competitions from boy racers. The interior of the 370Z is just as impressive. Forget everything you knew about the questionable 350Z interior – the 370Z is nice enough to wear an Infiniti badge. Top rate upholstery, plastics, and synthetics exist in abundance within the cozy cockpit. There is storage (or an optional NAV system) above the audio system. The three-pod IP, with three more gauges center-mounted high on the dash, is just about perfect. Unfortunately, the earned grade drops two full letters with the inclusion of that terrible fuel/coolant temperature mess on the far left. While it looks really poor in pictures, it's even worse in practice as the slightest bit of ambient light washes it out (or you find yourself mindlessly counting the remaining dots on the fuel gauge). This writer's six-foot two-inch frame fit comfortably into the supportive and nicely bolstered cloth seats. The cabin accommodates two with abundant legroom, headroom, and shoulder room. The steering wheel is meaty, and all controls fall readily to hand without a hint awkwardness. Our tested was lightly optioned (at $34,055 it was only fitted with the sport package, floor mats, and splash guards), yet it didn't feel stripped-down or budget-rate. From the driver's seat, the only real drawback – outward visibility – is blamed on the exterior styling. The view of the outside world is hampered by the massive C-pillars just behind the ears, the tiny slit of a rear window, and the oversized exterior mirrors that seem to occupy more than their share of the front …
Full Review

2009 370Z Overview

2009 Nissan 370Z - Click above for high-res gallery The first Datsun 240Z rolled into American showrooms in 1969. Four decades later, we've got our hands wrapped around the thick, leather, multi-function steering wheel of its direct descendant, the all-new 370Z. With a 332 hp V6 and a six-speed manual transmission directing power to the rear wheels, our outlook is decidedly positive as we head out on the street (our First Drive on the track was back in December). Is all of the hype surrounding this new coupe justified? How does it compare to the GT-R? Just how did the all-new Z-car fare after a week in our garage? Find out after the jump... Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE %Gallery-47190% Photos copyright ©2009 Drew Phillips / Weblogs, Inc. Our test model had been plunged in a bath of Monterey Blue paint at the Tochigi, Japan production facility and with a tint of metallic in its reflection, the all-new for 2009 coupe looks stunning with its shorter wheelbase and wide stance. Still instantly recognized as a "Z," the aluminum and steel sheet metal is wrapped aggressively around Nissan's "front midships" (FM) platform, shared with the Infiniti FX and G37 family. From the toothed front grille to the flared rear fenders, the styling leaves little doubt about its intended sports car mission. With more than a passing resemblance to the Nissan GT-R, the 370Z lures stares and thumbs-up from pedestrians, and stoplight competitions from boy racers. The interior of the 370Z is just as impressive. Forget everything you knew about the questionable 350Z interior – the 370Z is nice enough to wear an Infiniti badge. Top rate upholstery, plastics, and synthetics exist in abundance within the cozy cockpit. There is storage (or an optional NAV system) above the audio system. The three-pod IP, with three more gauges center-mounted high on the dash, is just about perfect. Unfortunately, the earned grade drops two full letters with the inclusion of that terrible fuel/coolant temperature mess on the far left. While it looks really poor in pictures, it's even worse in practice as the slightest bit of ambient light washes it out (or you find yourself mindlessly counting the remaining dots on the fuel gauge). This writer's six-foot two-inch frame fit comfortably into the supportive and nicely bolstered cloth seats. The cabin accommodates two with abundant legroom, headroom, and shoulder room. The steering wheel is meaty, and all controls fall readily to hand without a hint awkwardness. Our tested was lightly optioned (at $34,055 it was only fitted with the sport package, floor mats, and splash guards), yet it didn't feel stripped-down or budget-rate. From the driver's seat, the only real drawback – outward visibility – is blamed on the exterior styling. The view of the outside world is hampered by the massive C-pillars just behind the ears, the tiny slit of a rear window, and the oversized exterior mirrors that seem to occupy more than their share of the front …Hide Full Review