Base 2dr ConverTIble
2009 MINI Cooper

MSRP ?

$23,900
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Smart Buy Avg. Pricing ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 1.6LI-4
MPG MPG 28 City / 36 Hwy
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2009 Cooper Overview

2009 Mini Cooper S Convertible – Click above for high-res image gallery Back in 2001, BMW revived the Mini brand by unveiling a new Cooper model that updated the classic English design of the original while growing the car's trademark size just enough to fit the engineering, safety equipment and conveniences that modern drivers demand. It was a perfect play, and if Mini sales haven't exactly set the world on fire here in the U.S., that's only because the brand has been alone in teaching American car shoppers what Europeans already know: Premium small cars are worth every penny. In other words, Americans generally associate the value of a vehicle with its size – the more you pay, the larger a vehicle you should get. The Mini Cooper exists in stark contrast to this notion. Fast forward to 2009 and we're already a couple of years into the second generation of the modern Mini Cooper, also known as the R56. The redesigned hatchback was joined last year by the long-wheelbase Clubman and the R56 lineup is now complete with the arrival of the convertible model. Our tester, a 2009 Mini Cooper S Convertible, will challenge the notion that value equals size. Why? Aside from opting for the high-performance John Cooper Works trim, the convertible is the most expensive model in the Mini lineup, and the S model makes it even more so. The total tally for our tester, including $650 in destination charges, is $32,700. Read on to find out if the Mini Cooper S Convertible is packed with enough value to prevent its sticker shock from sending you into cardiac arrest. %Gallery-65370% Photos Copyright ©2009 John Neff / Weblogs, Inc. Now based on the second-gen R56 platform, the Mini S Convertible is 2.3 inches longer than the model it replaces, though at 146.2 inches long it's still the second smallest car sold in the U.S behind those Lilliputian Smart cars. The freshened front end is both taller and more rounded, concessions made to comply with new crash and pedestrian safety standards around the world, but the new Mini is still an unmistakable descendant of Sir Alec Issigonis' original design. The S Convertible is visually distinguished from the base model by an air intake at the leading edge of its hood, a unique and aggressive lower front fascia with chin spoiler, and a new lower rear fascia with a pair of chrome-tipped tailpipes exiting the center. Altogether they add some edginess to the Mini's normal cheery face, and the black bonnet stripes, included in the $1,500 Sport Package, are just enough war paint to warn would-be sports convertibles that this drop-top won't turn and run at the first sight of twisties. The interior should be instantly recognizable to fans of the first-gen modern Mini with an even larger speedometer than before placed in the center of the dash and a generously sized tachometer atop the steering column. Interior panels that match the car's body color remind us of the …
Full Review

2009 Cooper Overview

2009 Mini Cooper S Convertible – Click above for high-res image gallery Back in 2001, BMW revived the Mini brand by unveiling a new Cooper model that updated the classic English design of the original while growing the car's trademark size just enough to fit the engineering, safety equipment and conveniences that modern drivers demand. It was a perfect play, and if Mini sales haven't exactly set the world on fire here in the U.S., that's only because the brand has been alone in teaching American car shoppers what Europeans already know: Premium small cars are worth every penny. In other words, Americans generally associate the value of a vehicle with its size – the more you pay, the larger a vehicle you should get. The Mini Cooper exists in stark contrast to this notion. Fast forward to 2009 and we're already a couple of years into the second generation of the modern Mini Cooper, also known as the R56. The redesigned hatchback was joined last year by the long-wheelbase Clubman and the R56 lineup is now complete with the arrival of the convertible model. Our tester, a 2009 Mini Cooper S Convertible, will challenge the notion that value equals size. Why? Aside from opting for the high-performance John Cooper Works trim, the convertible is the most expensive model in the Mini lineup, and the S model makes it even more so. The total tally for our tester, including $650 in destination charges, is $32,700. Read on to find out if the Mini Cooper S Convertible is packed with enough value to prevent its sticker shock from sending you into cardiac arrest. %Gallery-65370% Photos Copyright ©2009 John Neff / Weblogs, Inc. Now based on the second-gen R56 platform, the Mini S Convertible is 2.3 inches longer than the model it replaces, though at 146.2 inches long it's still the second smallest car sold in the U.S behind those Lilliputian Smart cars. The freshened front end is both taller and more rounded, concessions made to comply with new crash and pedestrian safety standards around the world, but the new Mini is still an unmistakable descendant of Sir Alec Issigonis' original design. The S Convertible is visually distinguished from the base model by an air intake at the leading edge of its hood, a unique and aggressive lower front fascia with chin spoiler, and a new lower rear fascia with a pair of chrome-tipped tailpipes exiting the center. Altogether they add some edginess to the Mini's normal cheery face, and the black bonnet stripes, included in the $1,500 Sport Package, are just enough war paint to warn would-be sports convertibles that this drop-top won't turn and run at the first sight of twisties. The interior should be instantly recognizable to fans of the first-gen modern Mini with an even larger speedometer than before placed in the center of the dash and a generously sized tachometer atop the steering column. Interior panels that match the car's body color remind us of the …Hide Full Review