LTZ 4x4
2009 Chevrolet Tahoe

MSRP ?

$51,400
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 5.3LV-8
MPG MPG 14 City / 20 Hwy
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2009 Tahoe Overview

2009 Chevy Tahoe LTZ 6.2L 4x4 – Click above for high-res image gallery For a long time, gas prices in the United States were literally cheaper than dirt. Seriousl – check out the price of a bag of top soil at your local home improvement store. With such low fuel prices, the cost of operating a motor vehicle was really not much of an issue for most Americans. As a result, the only cost that concerned Americans when buying a vehicle was the monthly payment. People bought what ever they could afford on a monthly basis, not at the pump. The result was the rise of the personal use truck, and in particular, the sport utility vehicle. It started slowly in the 1980s with the Jeep Cherokee and really picked up steam with the launch of the Ford Explorer. As the Nineties wore on, people moved into even bigger full-size SUVs and the Chevy Tahoe was among the most successful up until the last few years. That's when sales hit a brick wall as gas prices finally started to climb. We recently got to spend some quality time with a 2009 Chevy Tahoe LTZ and its big 6.2-lliter V8. Follow the jump to see if this behemoth still has what it takes to charm consumers now that gas prices have ebbed. %Gallery-43946% Photos Copyright ©2009 Sam Abuelsamid / Weblogs, Inc. 2008 was a horrible time to be in the business of making big trucks, with every brand getting hammered hard first as gas prices went to $4 per gallon and then during the financial collapse in the Fall. Sales of the Tahoe dropped by more than 37 percent last year to just 91,578 units. Even at that level, the Tahoe was still the best-selling full-size SUV in America by a wide margin. Among those were several thousand hybrid models as they became widely available for the first time. For this visit to the Autoblog Garage however, General Motors sent over a loaded LTZ model with a 6.2-liter V8 cranking out 395 horsepower at a surprisingly lofty 5,600 rpm and 417 lb-ft of torque at 4,300 rpm. General Motors likes to advertise that it offers more models that achieve over 30 miles-per-gallon on the highway than any other automaker, but with all of that power on tap, this Tahoe is understandably not one of them. At a distance, the Tahoe's styling belies its dimensions. Its overall proportions with its short overhangs and tidy detailing give a handsome impression. Compared to the now euthanized Trailblazer EXT, the Tahoe doesn't look as top-heavy and clumsy. At the front, there's no doubt that this is a contemporary Chevrolet thanks to the dual port grille. Unlike the hybrid, this one doesn't have the deep front air dam and at least looks like it could handle crawling over some boulders without getting into too much trouble. As you walk up close, it becomes immediately apparent just how big the Tahoe is. At 16.8 feet long …
Full Review

2009 Tahoe Overview

2009 Chevy Tahoe LTZ 6.2L 4x4 – Click above for high-res image gallery For a long time, gas prices in the United States were literally cheaper than dirt. Seriousl – check out the price of a bag of top soil at your local home improvement store. With such low fuel prices, the cost of operating a motor vehicle was really not much of an issue for most Americans. As a result, the only cost that concerned Americans when buying a vehicle was the monthly payment. People bought what ever they could afford on a monthly basis, not at the pump. The result was the rise of the personal use truck, and in particular, the sport utility vehicle. It started slowly in the 1980s with the Jeep Cherokee and really picked up steam with the launch of the Ford Explorer. As the Nineties wore on, people moved into even bigger full-size SUVs and the Chevy Tahoe was among the most successful up until the last few years. That's when sales hit a brick wall as gas prices finally started to climb. We recently got to spend some quality time with a 2009 Chevy Tahoe LTZ and its big 6.2-lliter V8. Follow the jump to see if this behemoth still has what it takes to charm consumers now that gas prices have ebbed. %Gallery-43946% Photos Copyright ©2009 Sam Abuelsamid / Weblogs, Inc. 2008 was a horrible time to be in the business of making big trucks, with every brand getting hammered hard first as gas prices went to $4 per gallon and then during the financial collapse in the Fall. Sales of the Tahoe dropped by more than 37 percent last year to just 91,578 units. Even at that level, the Tahoe was still the best-selling full-size SUV in America by a wide margin. Among those were several thousand hybrid models as they became widely available for the first time. For this visit to the Autoblog Garage however, General Motors sent over a loaded LTZ model with a 6.2-liter V8 cranking out 395 horsepower at a surprisingly lofty 5,600 rpm and 417 lb-ft of torque at 4,300 rpm. General Motors likes to advertise that it offers more models that achieve over 30 miles-per-gallon on the highway than any other automaker, but with all of that power on tap, this Tahoe is understandably not one of them. At a distance, the Tahoe's styling belies its dimensions. Its overall proportions with its short overhangs and tidy detailing give a handsome impression. Compared to the now euthanized Trailblazer EXT, the Tahoe doesn't look as top-heavy and clumsy. At the front, there's no doubt that this is a contemporary Chevrolet thanks to the dual port grille. Unlike the hybrid, this one doesn't have the deep front air dam and at least looks like it could handle crawling over some boulders without getting into too much trouble. As you walk up close, it becomes immediately apparent just how big the Tahoe is. At 16.8 feet long …Hide Full Review