i 4dr Rear-wheel Drive Sedan
2009 BMW 750

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$80,300
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Engine Engine 4.4LV-8
MPG MPG 15 City / 22 Hwy
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2009 750 Overview

2009 BMW 750i – Click above for high-res image gallery The BMW 7 Series and the Mercedes-Benz S-class are two vehicles utterly defined by their birthplace. Each was spawned in Southern Germany, where massive stretches of autobahn honed their ability to cover boundless distances at high velocities, cosseting occupants in Teutonic luxury. But they're decidedly different beasts. In spite of their similarities, the two brands have always had distinct personalities. BMW followed its tag-line of the "Ultimate Driving Machine," while Mercedes stuck to its more sober image, focusing on its "Best in German engineering" meme. As so often happens, automakers feel compelled to grow and expand beyond traditional audiences, and at times, the result is a diluted product that strays from its roots. When everyone is attempting to cater to the broadest possible audience, overlap is inevitable and distinctions begin to disappear. Look no further than the American mid-size sedan segment, or in this case, the last generation 7-series. So for 2009, BMW sought to re-focus its uber-sedan on what it does best. Read on to find out if BMW succeeded or if the new 7 suffers from further dilution. %Gallery-50986% Photos Copyright ©2009 Sam Abuelsamid / Weblogs, Inc. It seems fitting that BMW's flagship would lead the way in introducing new design directions for the brand. The previous fourth-generation model marked the debut of the controversial Chris Bangle era. The Bangle 7 may not have received much in the way of critical acclaim for its aesthetics, but it was the best-selling generation to date, and its distinct styling cues have found their way into many other vehicles. Even with a mid-cycle refresh that significantly improved its looks, the fourth-gen. model still suffered from a top-heavy appearance that diverged from the lower, sleeker looks of earlier editions. This latest edition marks a return to form for BMW. While Bangle remained the titular head of BMW design during the course of the 7 Series development, his successor, Adrian van Hooydonk, led the team that created this new version. The result is a sedan with virtually the same dimensions as the last 7, but with an additional three-inches of wheelbase. Despite the stretch in the middle, the new car looks significantly smaller thanks to a slopping nose and contoured flanks that lend a tauter, more muscular appearance. Our first experience with the new 7 Series involved time in an extended wheelbase, sport pack-equipped 750Li. This time, our tester is a standard wheelbase 750i. Currently, the only engine available in the U.S. market 7-series is the 4.4-liter twin-turbo V8 that debuted last year in the X6. However, just before our test, BMW announced a new V12-powered 760 that will find its way to the States later this year, while buyers in other parts of the world have a choice of gas or diesel mills. With its 400 hp and 450 lb-ft of torque at just 1,800 rpm, the turbo V8 is an ideal power-plant for a big luxury sedan. It's only available …
Full Review

2009 750 Overview

2009 BMW 750i – Click above for high-res image gallery The BMW 7 Series and the Mercedes-Benz S-class are two vehicles utterly defined by their birthplace. Each was spawned in Southern Germany, where massive stretches of autobahn honed their ability to cover boundless distances at high velocities, cosseting occupants in Teutonic luxury. But they're decidedly different beasts. In spite of their similarities, the two brands have always had distinct personalities. BMW followed its tag-line of the "Ultimate Driving Machine," while Mercedes stuck to its more sober image, focusing on its "Best in German engineering" meme. As so often happens, automakers feel compelled to grow and expand beyond traditional audiences, and at times, the result is a diluted product that strays from its roots. When everyone is attempting to cater to the broadest possible audience, overlap is inevitable and distinctions begin to disappear. Look no further than the American mid-size sedan segment, or in this case, the last generation 7-series. So for 2009, BMW sought to re-focus its uber-sedan on what it does best. Read on to find out if BMW succeeded or if the new 7 suffers from further dilution. %Gallery-50986% Photos Copyright ©2009 Sam Abuelsamid / Weblogs, Inc. It seems fitting that BMW's flagship would lead the way in introducing new design directions for the brand. The previous fourth-generation model marked the debut of the controversial Chris Bangle era. The Bangle 7 may not have received much in the way of critical acclaim for its aesthetics, but it was the best-selling generation to date, and its distinct styling cues have found their way into many other vehicles. Even with a mid-cycle refresh that significantly improved its looks, the fourth-gen. model still suffered from a top-heavy appearance that diverged from the lower, sleeker looks of earlier editions. This latest edition marks a return to form for BMW. While Bangle remained the titular head of BMW design during the course of the 7 Series development, his successor, Adrian van Hooydonk, led the team that created this new version. The result is a sedan with virtually the same dimensions as the last 7, but with an additional three-inches of wheelbase. Despite the stretch in the middle, the new car looks significantly smaller thanks to a slopping nose and contoured flanks that lend a tauter, more muscular appearance. Our first experience with the new 7 Series involved time in an extended wheelbase, sport pack-equipped 750Li. This time, our tester is a standard wheelbase 750i. Currently, the only engine available in the U.S. market 7-series is the 4.4-liter twin-turbo V8 that debuted last year in the X6. However, just before our test, BMW announced a new V12-powered 760 that will find its way to the States later this year, while buyers in other parts of the world have a choice of gas or diesel mills. With its 400 hp and 450 lb-ft of torque at just 1,800 rpm, the turbo V8 is an ideal power-plant for a big luxury sedan. It's only available …Hide Full Review