Lux 2dr Front-wheel Drive Convertible
2008 Volkswagen Eos

MSRP ?

$35,100
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Engine Engine 2.0LI-4
MPG MPG 21 City / 30 Hwy
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2008 Eos Overview

Eos was the Greek goddess of the dawn.The Volkswagen Eos is a two-door, four-seat, retractable hardtop convertible.It brings on the sun with the press of a button.In a display of modern engineering, the hard roof rises up, the trunk lid opens, the rear window folds, then the pieces neatly stack themselves into the trunk before the lid closes, hiding everything and giving the Eos the clean look of a convertible.Press the button again and the glass-paneled roof arises, unfolds, and firmly latches in place.Eos is now a sanctuary, tight and quiet as a coupe.

Retractable hardtops are nothing new.A few European exotics offered them in the 1930s, and the 1957-59 Ford Skyliner was probably the first mass-produced example of the breed.But Eisenhower-era Americans rejected the increased cost and complexity of the Skyliner, with many preferring to buy a lower-priced, standard cloth-topped Ford convertible off the same showroom floor.

Our standards of comfort have changed since then, as have our concerns about security.Lately manufacturers of expensive luxury roadsters have been offering more and more models with new, high-tech folding metal roofs.With the Eos, Volkswagen has delivered the first of these new-generation folding hardtops that most of us can afford.The Eos is the first modern European hardtop convertible priced under $30,000.

Even with the top down, Eos feels tighter than most older convertibles, with less cowl shake on rough roads.When it is raised, the glass top gives the Eos a unique appearance.And it's entertaining to watch it go up or down, a feat that can be performed by remote control.

Though it's a small car, the Eos seats four, and getting into the back seat is relatively easy.The interior is trimmed nicely, an area where Volkswagen excels.

We were more than happy with the base model, equipped with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine coupled to a six-speed manual transmission, and loaded with safety features, air conditioning and a decent stereo.The turbo engine delivers brisk acceleration performance and is a smooth companion around town.

Drivers who prefer an automatic transmission, especially those who must commute in heavy traffic, might prefer the V6 engine, although that decision can add $8,000 to the bottom line.

Either way, the Eos represents a good compromise between a sports car and a sedan.It's sporty and practical, and yet offers opportunities for top-down worship of the sun, the moon and the stars.
Full Review

2008 Eos Overview

Eos was the Greek goddess of the dawn.The Volkswagen Eos is a two-door, four-seat, retractable hardtop convertible.It brings on the sun with the press of a button.In a display of modern engineering, the hard roof rises up, the trunk lid opens, the rear window folds, then the pieces neatly stack themselves into the trunk before the lid closes, hiding everything and giving the Eos the clean look of a convertible.Press the button again and the glass-paneled roof arises, unfolds, and firmly latches in place.Eos is now a sanctuary, tight and quiet as a coupe.

Retractable hardtops are nothing new.A few European exotics offered them in the 1930s, and the 1957-59 Ford Skyliner was probably the first mass-produced example of the breed.But Eisenhower-era Americans rejected the increased cost and complexity of the Skyliner, with many preferring to buy a lower-priced, standard cloth-topped Ford convertible off the same showroom floor.

Our standards of comfort have changed since then, as have our concerns about security.Lately manufacturers of expensive luxury roadsters have been offering more and more models with new, high-tech folding metal roofs.With the Eos, Volkswagen has delivered the first of these new-generation folding hardtops that most of us can afford.The Eos is the first modern European hardtop convertible priced under $30,000.

Even with the top down, Eos feels tighter than most older convertibles, with less cowl shake on rough roads.When it is raised, the glass top gives the Eos a unique appearance.And it's entertaining to watch it go up or down, a feat that can be performed by remote control.

Though it's a small car, the Eos seats four, and getting into the back seat is relatively easy.The interior is trimmed nicely, an area where Volkswagen excels.

We were more than happy with the base model, equipped with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine coupled to a six-speed manual transmission, and loaded with safety features, air conditioning and a decent stereo.The turbo engine delivers brisk acceleration performance and is a smooth companion around town.

Drivers who prefer an automatic transmission, especially those who must commute in heavy traffic, might prefer the V6 engine, although that decision can add $8,000 to the bottom line.

Either way, the Eos represents a good compromise between a sports car and a sedan.It's sporty and practical, and yet offers opportunities for top-down worship of the sun, the moon and the stars.Hide Full Review