2008 Saturn VUE

MSRP ?

$21,525 - $29,300
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Engine Engine 2.4LI-4
MPG MPG 19 City / 26 Hwy
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2008 VUE Overview

2008 Saturn Vue Red Line – Click above for high-res image gallery The introduction of the 2008 Saturn Vue is the latest element of the Saturn's ongoing product overhaul. In the wake of the Sky, Aura, and Outlook, we had high expectations for the all-new Vue. Gone are the outgoing model's clunky styling, cheesy faux grille, plastacular body panels and ho-hum street presence. In its place, we're given a smart-looking, well-packaged Opel Antara clone that's positioned as an obvious step up from its predecessor. Sure, the old Vue had some things going for it -- after its last facelift it had a decent-looking interior, and despite its outward visual shortcomings, it offered plenty of useful cargo room -- but it just wasn't very exciting in the grand scheme of things. Its departure is decidedly unlamented, and we eagerly accepted the keys when GM entrusted us with a spanking-new Vue Red Line for a week. Read on to see how well the newest Saturn lives up to the hype. %Gallery-8729% All photos Copyright ©2007 Alex Núñez / Weblogs, Inc. I'd been seeing the new-gen Vues on the road for a few weeks ahead of our tester's arrival, and for some reason was working under the assumption that I would be testing the Vue XR. When I walked out to take delivery, I'll admit to being pleasantly surprised to see the Vue Red Line. That colorful moniker, for those of you still not familiar with the Saturn nomenclature, indicates a sport/performance-based model. The Vue Red Line joins the Sky Red Line in the brand's sporty roster, but unlike the turbo Sky, which is much more powerful and offers a radically different driving experience than its standard-grade counterpart, the Vue Red Line has a lot more in common with its XR-grade stablemate. The two share GM's increasingly commonplace (this is a good thing) 3.6L VVT V6 (257 hp/248 lb-ft in this application) and 6T70 6-speed automatic transmission, with the Red Line adding as standard equipment the Tapshift feature that allows the driver to change gears manually. In our case, the tranny delivered power to all four corners thanks to the available AWD option. The Red Line adopts a more athletic stance, sitting nearly an inch lower than the XR, and also has differently-tuned shocks and struts, different spring rates, and unique bushings and stabilizer bars. The Red Line-specific appearance package augments the lowered look with a comprehensive visual upgrade. A unique, super-aggressive front fascia is the Red Line's calling card, and makes it unmistakable next to its more sedate kin. The horizontal slats of the standard Vue's grillework are replaced by a sportier-looking diamond mesh pattern. The look is repeated on the gaping, love-it-or-hate-it lower opening. It's substantial enough that no one would hold it against you if you looked for an intercooler behind it, but your search would be fruitless. It's flanked by a set of foglamps, and if you move to the side, smooth rocker panels span the distance between …
Full Review

2008 VUE Overview

2008 Saturn Vue Red Line – Click above for high-res image gallery The introduction of the 2008 Saturn Vue is the latest element of the Saturn's ongoing product overhaul. In the wake of the Sky, Aura, and Outlook, we had high expectations for the all-new Vue. Gone are the outgoing model's clunky styling, cheesy faux grille, plastacular body panels and ho-hum street presence. In its place, we're given a smart-looking, well-packaged Opel Antara clone that's positioned as an obvious step up from its predecessor. Sure, the old Vue had some things going for it -- after its last facelift it had a decent-looking interior, and despite its outward visual shortcomings, it offered plenty of useful cargo room -- but it just wasn't very exciting in the grand scheme of things. Its departure is decidedly unlamented, and we eagerly accepted the keys when GM entrusted us with a spanking-new Vue Red Line for a week. Read on to see how well the newest Saturn lives up to the hype. %Gallery-8729% All photos Copyright ©2007 Alex Núñez / Weblogs, Inc. I'd been seeing the new-gen Vues on the road for a few weeks ahead of our tester's arrival, and for some reason was working under the assumption that I would be testing the Vue XR. When I walked out to take delivery, I'll admit to being pleasantly surprised to see the Vue Red Line. That colorful moniker, for those of you still not familiar with the Saturn nomenclature, indicates a sport/performance-based model. The Vue Red Line joins the Sky Red Line in the brand's sporty roster, but unlike the turbo Sky, which is much more powerful and offers a radically different driving experience than its standard-grade counterpart, the Vue Red Line has a lot more in common with its XR-grade stablemate. The two share GM's increasingly commonplace (this is a good thing) 3.6L VVT V6 (257 hp/248 lb-ft in this application) and 6T70 6-speed automatic transmission, with the Red Line adding as standard equipment the Tapshift feature that allows the driver to change gears manually. In our case, the tranny delivered power to all four corners thanks to the available AWD option. The Red Line adopts a more athletic stance, sitting nearly an inch lower than the XR, and also has differently-tuned shocks and struts, different spring rates, and unique bushings and stabilizer bars. The Red Line-specific appearance package augments the lowered look with a comprehensive visual upgrade. A unique, super-aggressive front fascia is the Red Line's calling card, and makes it unmistakable next to its more sedate kin. The horizontal slats of the standard Vue's grillework are replaced by a sportier-looking diamond mesh pattern. The look is repeated on the gaping, love-it-or-hate-it lower opening. It's substantial enough that no one would hold it against you if you looked for an intercooler behind it, but your search would be fruitless. It's flanked by a set of foglamps, and if you move to the side, smooth rocker panels span the distance between …Hide Full Review