DE 4dr Sedan
2008 Mitsubishi Lancer

MSRP ?

$13,990
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 2.0LI-4
MPG MPG 21 City / 29 Hwy
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2008 Lancer Overview

2008 Mitsubishi Evolution X MR – Click above for high-res image gallery Here's a revelation: being stuck in traffic sucks. And it's even more infuriating behind the wheel of an Evo. Despite what some scribes might lead you to believe, the Evos of yore (VIII and IX) weren't deplorable daily drivers. Granted, Mitsu's engineers erred on the stiff side with the Evo's ride, and it didn't help that the tiller provided more feedback than a Metallica sound check. But the real reason jaded journos harped on the old Evo's workaday unfriendliness was because nothing is more frustrating than piloting concentrated adrenaline in a sea of buzzkill. With the 2008 Evolution X, Mitsubishi attempted to rectify some of the Evo's (perceived) shortcomings by equipping the range-topping MR with more amenities, more sound-deadening material, a more compliant ride and a new twin-clutch transmission to balance back-road thrills with daily livability. But all those extras have caused the Evo's curb weight to skyrocket, and its price tag has followed suit. For $42,000 – the sticker on our MR tester – you can get your hands on the new yardstick for high-end, entry-level performance: the BMW 335i. While that kind of wallet shock could ostracize the Evo's core demographic, Mitsubishi is quick to point out that the new MR is for the discerning enthusiast: a more sensible, mature owner. But does mature mean infirmed? Read on to find out. %Gallery-31014% All photos Copyright ©2008 Brad Wood / Weblogs, Inc. Despite what you've seen plastered across the interwebs and on local newsstands, the new Evo is every bit as potent as its predecessors. But the MR takes a slightly different tack when it comes to serving up track attacks and tempered trips to pick up the kiddies. At the heart of the Evolution experience are two elements that made the previous iterations a success with enthusiasts: a turbocharged four and a high-tech all-wheel-drive system. Both are present and accounted for, but they live up to the Evolution's namesake more than any other model in its 16-year history. To begin with, Mitsubishi dropped its 4G63 workhorse in favor of the all-new 4B11 2.0-liter inline-four, originally equipped in the Lancer ES. But don't let its pedestrian origins deceive you. With a revised 9.0:1 compression ratio, a semi-closed deck, an aluminum block and a twin-scroll turbo, the new mill has proven to be incredibly capable and eminently tweakable. The turbo'd four is churning out 291 hp at 6,500 rpm, while peak torque – 300 lb.-ft. of the stuff – is available from 4,000 rpm. Those figures might not set the forums on fire, particularly when you consider the MR's 3,594-pound curb weight, but how that power reaches the ground speaks volumes about Mitsubishi's new dog and its trick tranny. Mitsubishi has stepped up the dual-clutch plate with its TC-SST gearbox, the automaker's first foray into the world of automated manuals. Like the transmissions available in a variety of VW and Audi offerings, along with the Nissan GT-R …
Full Review

2008 Lancer Overview

2008 Mitsubishi Evolution X MR – Click above for high-res image gallery Here's a revelation: being stuck in traffic sucks. And it's even more infuriating behind the wheel of an Evo. Despite what some scribes might lead you to believe, the Evos of yore (VIII and IX) weren't deplorable daily drivers. Granted, Mitsu's engineers erred on the stiff side with the Evo's ride, and it didn't help that the tiller provided more feedback than a Metallica sound check. But the real reason jaded journos harped on the old Evo's workaday unfriendliness was because nothing is more frustrating than piloting concentrated adrenaline in a sea of buzzkill. With the 2008 Evolution X, Mitsubishi attempted to rectify some of the Evo's (perceived) shortcomings by equipping the range-topping MR with more amenities, more sound-deadening material, a more compliant ride and a new twin-clutch transmission to balance back-road thrills with daily livability. But all those extras have caused the Evo's curb weight to skyrocket, and its price tag has followed suit. For $42,000 – the sticker on our MR tester – you can get your hands on the new yardstick for high-end, entry-level performance: the BMW 335i. While that kind of wallet shock could ostracize the Evo's core demographic, Mitsubishi is quick to point out that the new MR is for the discerning enthusiast: a more sensible, mature owner. But does mature mean infirmed? Read on to find out. %Gallery-31014% All photos Copyright ©2008 Brad Wood / Weblogs, Inc. Despite what you've seen plastered across the interwebs and on local newsstands, the new Evo is every bit as potent as its predecessors. But the MR takes a slightly different tack when it comes to serving up track attacks and tempered trips to pick up the kiddies. At the heart of the Evolution experience are two elements that made the previous iterations a success with enthusiasts: a turbocharged four and a high-tech all-wheel-drive system. Both are present and accounted for, but they live up to the Evolution's namesake more than any other model in its 16-year history. To begin with, Mitsubishi dropped its 4G63 workhorse in favor of the all-new 4B11 2.0-liter inline-four, originally equipped in the Lancer ES. But don't let its pedestrian origins deceive you. With a revised 9.0:1 compression ratio, a semi-closed deck, an aluminum block and a twin-scroll turbo, the new mill has proven to be incredibly capable and eminently tweakable. The turbo'd four is churning out 291 hp at 6,500 rpm, while peak torque – 300 lb.-ft. of the stuff – is available from 4,000 rpm. Those figures might not set the forums on fire, particularly when you consider the MR's 3,594-pound curb weight, but how that power reaches the ground speaks volumes about Mitsubishi's new dog and its trick tranny. Mitsubishi has stepped up the dual-clutch plate with its TC-SST gearbox, the automaker's first foray into the world of automated manuals. Like the transmissions available in a variety of VW and Audi offerings, along with the Nissan GT-R …Hide Full Review