2008 Maserati Quattroporte

MSRP ?

$114,750 - $128,165
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 4.2LV-8
MPG MPG 12 City / 18 Hwy
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2008 Quattroporte Overview

Maserati Quattropore S – Click above for high-res image gallery Let's be honest: cars can be a mode of transportation, but you're not reading Walkoblog or Cycleblog, now are you? At the heart of matters, what we're really pursuing here is that unbridled enthusiasm we had for cars as children. With every comparison of engine output and Nurburgring lap times, we're reaching back to the schoolyard, childishly debating the superiority of one sportscar over another. And all these galleries of high resolution images we bring you are just our updated version of hanging posters of Ferraris and Lamborghinis on the walls of our childhood bedrooms. How disappointed our younger selves would be, however, at what we end up driving when we finally have the means: ho-hum family sedans, bloated SUVs and wobly mini-vans. If only someone made an exotic sedan – not a compromise between the two, but a genuine exotic with four doors. That's exactly what Maserati did in 2003 with the revival of the Quattroporte, with a little help from sister-brand Ferrari. With the Quattroporte, Maserati has proven itself capable of satisfying both our inner child and the one sitting in the back. A tough act to follow, then, because a sequel is seldom as exciting the original. But after 15,000 units delivered, the Quattroporte was treated to a mid-cycle refresh, sharpening up its already luscious styling, throwing in a host of new features and, most tantalizingly, dropping a bigger, more powerful engine into the mix. With such promise in store, we headed out to Austria to see what the boys from Modena had cooked up... and to seek out that boyhood grin once again. %Gallery-28142% Photos Copyright ©2008 Noah Joseph / Weblogs, Inc. First things first, let's set the record straight: while the new Quattroporte isn't entirely new, it's far from a fresh coat of paint (although new color options are also available). For 2009, the only true exotic sedan on the market has been treated to an extensive array of updates. The exterior has been thoroughly revised, from the front bumper to the rear, incorporating new LED headlights and taillamps and a host of stylistic alterations in between, all of which make the Quattroporte even more dazzling than the outgoing model. The interior has likewise been substantially revised, including a new infotainment console developed by Bose specifically for Maserati. The unit incorporates the sound system (with iPod integration, a 40GB hard disk, XM satellite radio and an optical drive capable of playing just about anything you could fit in there), plus a surprisingly user-friendly sat-nav unit. It took us a while to figure out how to navigate the system, controlled by just two knobs and a few buttons, but once we did found it far more intuitive than the increasingly frustrating systems on other luxury sedans. The new seats offer plenty of support in the twisty bits, while being supple enough to offer comfort for long cruises, and the updated ergonomics were easy to navigate. …
Full Review

2008 Quattroporte Overview

Maserati Quattropore S – Click above for high-res image gallery Let's be honest: cars can be a mode of transportation, but you're not reading Walkoblog or Cycleblog, now are you? At the heart of matters, what we're really pursuing here is that unbridled enthusiasm we had for cars as children. With every comparison of engine output and Nurburgring lap times, we're reaching back to the schoolyard, childishly debating the superiority of one sportscar over another. And all these galleries of high resolution images we bring you are just our updated version of hanging posters of Ferraris and Lamborghinis on the walls of our childhood bedrooms. How disappointed our younger selves would be, however, at what we end up driving when we finally have the means: ho-hum family sedans, bloated SUVs and wobly mini-vans. If only someone made an exotic sedan – not a compromise between the two, but a genuine exotic with four doors. That's exactly what Maserati did in 2003 with the revival of the Quattroporte, with a little help from sister-brand Ferrari. With the Quattroporte, Maserati has proven itself capable of satisfying both our inner child and the one sitting in the back. A tough act to follow, then, because a sequel is seldom as exciting the original. But after 15,000 units delivered, the Quattroporte was treated to a mid-cycle refresh, sharpening up its already luscious styling, throwing in a host of new features and, most tantalizingly, dropping a bigger, more powerful engine into the mix. With such promise in store, we headed out to Austria to see what the boys from Modena had cooked up... and to seek out that boyhood grin once again. %Gallery-28142% Photos Copyright ©2008 Noah Joseph / Weblogs, Inc. First things first, let's set the record straight: while the new Quattroporte isn't entirely new, it's far from a fresh coat of paint (although new color options are also available). For 2009, the only true exotic sedan on the market has been treated to an extensive array of updates. The exterior has been thoroughly revised, from the front bumper to the rear, incorporating new LED headlights and taillamps and a host of stylistic alterations in between, all of which make the Quattroporte even more dazzling than the outgoing model. The interior has likewise been substantially revised, including a new infotainment console developed by Bose specifically for Maserati. The unit incorporates the sound system (with iPod integration, a 40GB hard disk, XM satellite radio and an optical drive capable of playing just about anything you could fit in there), plus a surprisingly user-friendly sat-nav unit. It took us a while to figure out how to navigate the system, controlled by just two knobs and a few buttons, but once we did found it far more intuitive than the increasingly frustrating systems on other luxury sedans. The new seats offer plenty of support in the twisty bits, while being supple enough to offer comfort for long cruises, and the updated ergonomics were easy to navigate. …Hide Full Review