2008 Chevrolet Malibu

MSRP ?

$19,900 - $27,095
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 2.4LI-4
MPG MPG 22 City / 30 Hwy
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2008 Malibu Overview

click above for a high-res gallery of the 2008 Chevy Malibu LT Once upon a time, General Motors' mid-sized models were the perennial top-selling passenger cars in America. Within my own lifetime, the Oldsmobile Cutlass topped the sales charts for years on end. But somewhere along the way, it all went pear-shaped for GM. Its cars went from being perpetual sales leaders into a perpetual sales decline. As GM's car sales tanked, the Toyota Camry and Honda Accord picked up the slack and are now considered the standard by which others in the class are measured. The first signs of a real revival in the GM sedan lineup appeared in 2006 when the Saturn Aura debuted to decent reviews though somewhat lukewarm sales. Then, last January at the Detroit Auto Show, GM debuted two new production sedans, the Cadillac CTS and the car that just spent a week in the Autoblog Garage, the 2008 Chevrolet Malibu. The Malibu is here now, so let's find out what it's like to live with for a week. %Gallery-12459% All photos Copyright ©2007 Sam Abuelsamid / Weblogs, Inc. The Chevy Volt may represent the future of General Motors power-train technology, but before it can become a reality, GM needs a steady cash flow to fund development. That's the job of the Malibu. The last generation Malibu was bland with some slightly odd design details, while the one before that was just plain invisible. In this class, bland styling is not necessarily a bad thing as the Accord and Camry have clearly demonstrated over the past decade. However, the Japanese brands have backed up their innocuous looks with a reputation for impeccable build quality and levels of refinement that are considered well beyond their price point. That's something equivalent domestic models have been lacking until relatively recently. When the latest edition of the Malibu debuted last year, it wore what is easily the best interpretation of Chevy's current corporate face with a large, horizontally-split grille. In addition to the bold-looking nose, virtually the whole car drew praise from onlookers at the 2007 Detroit Auto Show. The one possible weak spot was the back end that features taillights which still look like something of an after thought. The rest of the car is so good, however, that the back lights are easily forgotten. The car has handsome proportions with a long, sleek roof-line that draws some obvious inspiration from the Volkswagen Phaeton, among other cars. The relative absence of surface detailing serves to point out how well Chevrolet got this basic look just right. The details that appear upon close inspection also show the thought that was put into the new Malibu. Even on this slightly above entry-level LT, nothing on the outside of the car looks cheap. The 225/50R17 tires and wheels aren't undersized, fill the wheel wells nicely and sit flush with the surrounding body. Those attractive five spoke wheels? They are actually plastic wheel covers on steel wheels. They may be less expensive …
Full Review

2008 Malibu Overview

click above for a high-res gallery of the 2008 Chevy Malibu LT Once upon a time, General Motors' mid-sized models were the perennial top-selling passenger cars in America. Within my own lifetime, the Oldsmobile Cutlass topped the sales charts for years on end. But somewhere along the way, it all went pear-shaped for GM. Its cars went from being perpetual sales leaders into a perpetual sales decline. As GM's car sales tanked, the Toyota Camry and Honda Accord picked up the slack and are now considered the standard by which others in the class are measured. The first signs of a real revival in the GM sedan lineup appeared in 2006 when the Saturn Aura debuted to decent reviews though somewhat lukewarm sales. Then, last January at the Detroit Auto Show, GM debuted two new production sedans, the Cadillac CTS and the car that just spent a week in the Autoblog Garage, the 2008 Chevrolet Malibu. The Malibu is here now, so let's find out what it's like to live with for a week. %Gallery-12459% All photos Copyright ©2007 Sam Abuelsamid / Weblogs, Inc. The Chevy Volt may represent the future of General Motors power-train technology, but before it can become a reality, GM needs a steady cash flow to fund development. That's the job of the Malibu. The last generation Malibu was bland with some slightly odd design details, while the one before that was just plain invisible. In this class, bland styling is not necessarily a bad thing as the Accord and Camry have clearly demonstrated over the past decade. However, the Japanese brands have backed up their innocuous looks with a reputation for impeccable build quality and levels of refinement that are considered well beyond their price point. That's something equivalent domestic models have been lacking until relatively recently. When the latest edition of the Malibu debuted last year, it wore what is easily the best interpretation of Chevy's current corporate face with a large, horizontally-split grille. In addition to the bold-looking nose, virtually the whole car drew praise from onlookers at the 2007 Detroit Auto Show. The one possible weak spot was the back end that features taillights which still look like something of an after thought. The rest of the car is so good, however, that the back lights are easily forgotten. The car has handsome proportions with a long, sleek roof-line that draws some obvious inspiration from the Volkswagen Phaeton, among other cars. The relative absence of surface detailing serves to point out how well Chevrolet got this basic look just right. The details that appear upon close inspection also show the thought that was put into the new Malibu. Even on this slightly above entry-level LT, nothing on the outside of the car looks cheap. The 225/50R17 tires and wheels aren't undersized, fill the wheel wells nicely and sit flush with the surrounding body. Those attractive five spoke wheels? They are actually plastic wheel covers on steel wheels. They may be less expensive …Hide Full Review