2008 Chevrolet HHR

MSRP ?

$16,730 - $22,925
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 2.2LI-4
MPG MPG 21 City / 30 Hwy
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2008 HHR Overview

2008 Chevy HHR SS – Click above for high-res image gallery Our first experience with the Chevy HHR was back in 2006 when we rented one in Los Angeles while covering the 2006 L.A. Auto Show. Being a fleet vehicle, our HHR rental failed to impress with its raspy, underpowered Ecotec four-cylinder and cheap interior materials. The HHR does, however, have a way about itself. Its retro-inspired design is just plain good looking, better than the PT Cruiser to which this vehicle is most often compared (they were both designed by Brian Nesibtt, GM's current Executive Director of its European design center), and its outward attractiveness shows even on bare bones rental units like the one we abused in L.A. The 2008 Chevy HHR SS would seem to be the HHR we always wanted, with more power, an upgraded interior, aggressive tweaks to the exterior and the same two-box shape and clever cargo solutions that make the base model popular. But with the market for new car sales in the U.S. as soft as it is, should Chevy be spending its time making a high-horsepower, better handling SS version of a vehicle like the HHR? Read on to find out if their effort was worth it. %Gallery-24177% All photos Copyright ©2008 John Neff / Weblogs, Inc. The HHR's retro design is probably not for everyone, but it's a hit with us. It applies specific cues from the 1949 Chevy Suburban to a smaller, tidier package and adds just enough modernity to avoid being a caricature of the past. The General Motors Performance Division (GMPD) didn't just slap a spoiler and some big wheels on a base model to make the HHR SS, but gave the high-performance model a completely new front fascia with a split grille, big lower air intake framing the turbocharged engine's intercooler and a subtle chin spoiler. Part of what makes the HHR's retro design so nostalgic are its chunky fenders that used to be all the rage some 60 years ago, and here they look right at home shrouding a set of large 18-inch aluminum wheels wearing Michelin all-seasons. There's also a spoiler perched atop the rear hatch and a new rear apron through which a single, larger exhaust tip exits. Finally, there are special "SS Turbocharged" badges heralding the vehicle's motive force on each front door and the rear liftgate. Our HRR SS tester was coated in a rich shade of Blue Flash Metallic paint, and thanks to body-colored mirrors, side sills and super chunky pillars, there's a lot of surface area to show off the color. While those wide pillars may look fun from the outside, but they also create some big blind spots from the driver's seat. Staring through the short and rather upright windshield can also be frustrating as traffic lights disappear from view long before you reach the white line. This is the price one pays for a cool design. The interior of the HHR SS is made from the …
Full Review

2008 HHR Overview

2008 Chevy HHR SS – Click above for high-res image gallery Our first experience with the Chevy HHR was back in 2006 when we rented one in Los Angeles while covering the 2006 L.A. Auto Show. Being a fleet vehicle, our HHR rental failed to impress with its raspy, underpowered Ecotec four-cylinder and cheap interior materials. The HHR does, however, have a way about itself. Its retro-inspired design is just plain good looking, better than the PT Cruiser to which this vehicle is most often compared (they were both designed by Brian Nesibtt, GM's current Executive Director of its European design center), and its outward attractiveness shows even on bare bones rental units like the one we abused in L.A. The 2008 Chevy HHR SS would seem to be the HHR we always wanted, with more power, an upgraded interior, aggressive tweaks to the exterior and the same two-box shape and clever cargo solutions that make the base model popular. But with the market for new car sales in the U.S. as soft as it is, should Chevy be spending its time making a high-horsepower, better handling SS version of a vehicle like the HHR? Read on to find out if their effort was worth it. %Gallery-24177% All photos Copyright ©2008 John Neff / Weblogs, Inc. The HHR's retro design is probably not for everyone, but it's a hit with us. It applies specific cues from the 1949 Chevy Suburban to a smaller, tidier package and adds just enough modernity to avoid being a caricature of the past. The General Motors Performance Division (GMPD) didn't just slap a spoiler and some big wheels on a base model to make the HHR SS, but gave the high-performance model a completely new front fascia with a split grille, big lower air intake framing the turbocharged engine's intercooler and a subtle chin spoiler. Part of what makes the HHR's retro design so nostalgic are its chunky fenders that used to be all the rage some 60 years ago, and here they look right at home shrouding a set of large 18-inch aluminum wheels wearing Michelin all-seasons. There's also a spoiler perched atop the rear hatch and a new rear apron through which a single, larger exhaust tip exits. Finally, there are special "SS Turbocharged" badges heralding the vehicle's motive force on each front door and the rear liftgate. Our HRR SS tester was coated in a rich shade of Blue Flash Metallic paint, and thanks to body-colored mirrors, side sills and super chunky pillars, there's a lot of surface area to show off the color. While those wide pillars may look fun from the outside, but they also create some big blind spots from the driver's seat. Staring through the short and rather upright windshield can also be frustrating as traffic lights disappear from view long before you reach the white line. This is the price one pays for a cool design. The interior of the HHR SS is made from the …Hide Full Review