2008 BMW M3

MSRP ?

$53,800 - $64,950
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Engine Engine 4.0LV-8
MPG MPG 14 City / 20 Hwy
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2008 M3 Overview

2008 BMW M3 MT6 – Click above for high-res image gallery Third-party performance tuners like Alpina, AMG, Brabus, Ruf and others have thrived in the land of the autobahn, typically modifying cars from one particular brand. In the late '70s, BMW became the first of the German automakers to establish its own in-house tuning division, incorporating its motorsports arm into what's now know as the M division. The firm's racing knowledge disseminated down to its production cars with the introduction of the M1 and later the M535i. In subsequent years, M followed up with the M5 and M3. Eventually Mercedes followed suit by buying out AMG, while Audi launched Quattro GmbH. Over the past two decades, M has continued to create ever faster iterations of mainstream Bimmers and for 2008 the M brain trust brings us the fourth generation of the M3. The original 1986 M3 used the boxy body of the E30 3-series coupe, equipped with a high output, 16-valve four cylinder engine to homologate the body and engine for Group A touring car racing. Over the years, M3s, like all other BMWs (and pretty much every other car on the road), have grown bigger, heavier and more powerful. The E36 and E46 M3s both drew motive force from in-line six-cylinder engines ranging from 240hp to 333hp. The new E90-based M3 has what could turn out to be the ultimate engine of the series, with an all-new 4.0-liter V8 generating 414 hp and 295 lb.-ft. of torque. But what's it like to live with? Follow the jump to find out. %Gallery-26780% Photos Copyright ©2008 Sam Abuelsamid / Weblogs, Inc. BMW offers the 2008 M3 in coupe, sedan and convertible flavors, but for us, we got the pick of the litter. Our tester had two openings to access the cabin, a fixed carbon fiber roof, a menacing Sparkling Graphite Metallic paint job and a six-speed, swap-it-yourself, manual gearbox. For those who prefer to let the car handle gear selection, the dreaded SMG automated manual of the E46 has finally been discarded and replaced with a new seven-speed dual-clutch transmission. Since the debut of the thoroughly derided Bangle look, successive models have gradually toned down the excess surface development and odd-ball cut-lines. The current 3-Series coupe, and the M3 in particular, are easily the best looking BMWs in over a decade... at least since the the E46. The clean simple lines of the 3-Series coupe are made just a bit more muscular on the M3, with fenders flaring out to enclose the larger 19-inch wheels. The lower front fascia has a more prominent intake to draw cool air, while the fog lamps have been nixed in favor of ducting that leads to the brakes. The center of the hood swells to clear the voluminous air box on top of the V8 and functional vents on either side of the bulge and the fenders allow hot air to escape the engine bay. At the tail is a slim spoiler adorning the …
Full Review

2008 M3 Overview

2008 BMW M3 MT6 – Click above for high-res image gallery Third-party performance tuners like Alpina, AMG, Brabus, Ruf and others have thrived in the land of the autobahn, typically modifying cars from one particular brand. In the late '70s, BMW became the first of the German automakers to establish its own in-house tuning division, incorporating its motorsports arm into what's now know as the M division. The firm's racing knowledge disseminated down to its production cars with the introduction of the M1 and later the M535i. In subsequent years, M followed up with the M5 and M3. Eventually Mercedes followed suit by buying out AMG, while Audi launched Quattro GmbH. Over the past two decades, M has continued to create ever faster iterations of mainstream Bimmers and for 2008 the M brain trust brings us the fourth generation of the M3. The original 1986 M3 used the boxy body of the E30 3-series coupe, equipped with a high output, 16-valve four cylinder engine to homologate the body and engine for Group A touring car racing. Over the years, M3s, like all other BMWs (and pretty much every other car on the road), have grown bigger, heavier and more powerful. The E36 and E46 M3s both drew motive force from in-line six-cylinder engines ranging from 240hp to 333hp. The new E90-based M3 has what could turn out to be the ultimate engine of the series, with an all-new 4.0-liter V8 generating 414 hp and 295 lb.-ft. of torque. But what's it like to live with? Follow the jump to find out. %Gallery-26780% Photos Copyright ©2008 Sam Abuelsamid / Weblogs, Inc. BMW offers the 2008 M3 in coupe, sedan and convertible flavors, but for us, we got the pick of the litter. Our tester had two openings to access the cabin, a fixed carbon fiber roof, a menacing Sparkling Graphite Metallic paint job and a six-speed, swap-it-yourself, manual gearbox. For those who prefer to let the car handle gear selection, the dreaded SMG automated manual of the E46 has finally been discarded and replaced with a new seven-speed dual-clutch transmission. Since the debut of the thoroughly derided Bangle look, successive models have gradually toned down the excess surface development and odd-ball cut-lines. The current 3-Series coupe, and the M3 in particular, are easily the best looking BMWs in over a decade... at least since the the E46. The clean simple lines of the 3-Series coupe are made just a bit more muscular on the M3, with fenders flaring out to enclose the larger 19-inch wheels. The lower front fascia has a more prominent intake to draw cool air, while the fog lamps have been nixed in favor of ducting that leads to the brakes. The center of the hood swells to clear the voluminous air box on top of the V8 and functional vents on either side of the bulge and the fenders allow hot air to escape the engine bay. At the tail is a slim spoiler adorning the …Hide Full Review