SR5 5.7L V8 4dr 4x2 Crew Max
2007 Toyota Tundra

MSRP ?

$30,935
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 5.7LV-8
MPG MPG 16 City / 20 Hwy
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2007 Tundra Overview

Click photo above to view a gallery of Tundra shots I wanted to hate this thing. Toyota? Taking on the last bastion of red blooded American pickups? Yeah, right! The domestic manufacturers have kept cranking up quality, capability and refinement levels - who's this upstart think it is, anyway? Not only has the Tundra garnered a metric crapload of commentary, it's ugly. Okay, not to everyone, but it reminds me of that time I got sand in my eyelids. When a Tundra Limited Double Cab unexpectedly arrived wearing a rather appropriate shade of Herman Melville white, I was primed to register severe intestinal discomfort. Dang. %Gallery-3192% Make no mistake, Toyota's not messing around; the Tundra is a serious truck. Its broad shoulders fit the same 79.9 inch suit as the GMT900s, while it stands as tall as the F150. The wheelbase options slot right in among the domestic competition, though there's been some controversy about frame construction. The previous Tundra was the first credible iteration of the effort begun with the T100, and the new model builds on that. Emerging fresh from the weightroom, the styling is more in your face, and the truck's been on a steady diet of growth hormone. The grille is big and bold, with a touch of Kenworth to the shape, though big rigs don't waste time with fake vents like the Tundra's proboscis. The Double Cab has four forward-opening doors and the running boards on our tester made the step up into the XL-tagged cab a trifle. Even after donning bulky insulated Carhartts and logger boots, there was stretch-out space at every seating position. Should the standard-hugeness of the Double Cab feel too snug, there's a XXL-size Crew Max that appears capable of housing a washer and dryer in back. A group of adults will be comfortable inside the Tundra, and there's plenty of cubbies and lids for them to flip, which will make for a conversation-free ride. Exploring the Tundra is a common occurrence when people first meet it. There's been so much hype about it, we wouldn't have been surprised to find the Fountain of Youth inside the center console. Alas, we didn't fare any better than Ponce de Leon, but the center console is capable of swallowing such bulky items as hanging files and laptop computers without a whimper. Even the underside of the lid has thoughtful spaces for credit cards, tissues, and other general detritus. Attention was paid to the fact that there will be business conducted from the cab. Solid cupholders abound in the Tundra as well, which is good because we all know that coffee is the fuel of getting things done. A look around the cab reveals an interior that trails the competition in materials and appearance. GM interiors are a step ahead of the Tundra, and the F150 is the Audi of pickup trucks, interior-wise. Hard, shiny plastic covers much of the Tundra's insides, and the split-personality dashboard is charitably described as interesting to behold. We'd …
Full Review

2007 Tundra Overview

Click photo above to view a gallery of Tundra shots I wanted to hate this thing. Toyota? Taking on the last bastion of red blooded American pickups? Yeah, right! The domestic manufacturers have kept cranking up quality, capability and refinement levels - who's this upstart think it is, anyway? Not only has the Tundra garnered a metric crapload of commentary, it's ugly. Okay, not to everyone, but it reminds me of that time I got sand in my eyelids. When a Tundra Limited Double Cab unexpectedly arrived wearing a rather appropriate shade of Herman Melville white, I was primed to register severe intestinal discomfort. Dang. %Gallery-3192% Make no mistake, Toyota's not messing around; the Tundra is a serious truck. Its broad shoulders fit the same 79.9 inch suit as the GMT900s, while it stands as tall as the F150. The wheelbase options slot right in among the domestic competition, though there's been some controversy about frame construction. The previous Tundra was the first credible iteration of the effort begun with the T100, and the new model builds on that. Emerging fresh from the weightroom, the styling is more in your face, and the truck's been on a steady diet of growth hormone. The grille is big and bold, with a touch of Kenworth to the shape, though big rigs don't waste time with fake vents like the Tundra's proboscis. The Double Cab has four forward-opening doors and the running boards on our tester made the step up into the XL-tagged cab a trifle. Even after donning bulky insulated Carhartts and logger boots, there was stretch-out space at every seating position. Should the standard-hugeness of the Double Cab feel too snug, there's a XXL-size Crew Max that appears capable of housing a washer and dryer in back. A group of adults will be comfortable inside the Tundra, and there's plenty of cubbies and lids for them to flip, which will make for a conversation-free ride. Exploring the Tundra is a common occurrence when people first meet it. There's been so much hype about it, we wouldn't have been surprised to find the Fountain of Youth inside the center console. Alas, we didn't fare any better than Ponce de Leon, but the center console is capable of swallowing such bulky items as hanging files and laptop computers without a whimper. Even the underside of the lid has thoughtful spaces for credit cards, tissues, and other general detritus. Attention was paid to the fact that there will be business conducted from the cab. Solid cupholders abound in the Tundra as well, which is good because we all know that coffee is the fuel of getting things done. A look around the cab reveals an interior that trails the competition in materials and appearance. GM interiors are a step ahead of the Tundra, and the F150 is the Audi of pickup trucks, interior-wise. Hard, shiny plastic covers much of the Tundra's insides, and the split-personality dashboard is charitably described as interesting to behold. We'd …Hide Full Review