2007 Pontiac Solstice

MSRP ?

$21,515 - $26,515
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

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Engine Engine 2.4LI-4
MPG MPG 20 City / 28 Hwy
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2007 Solstice Overview

2007 Pontiac Solstice GXP – Click above for high-res image gallery The Pontiac Solstice is the crown prince of the General's lineup. With curves and flares, bulges and rakes, it's the modern equivalent of the Coke bottle aesthetic of yesteryear. Sure, some may prefer its sheetmetal sibling the Sky, but regardless of your chosen chariot, they're both head-turners. When the Solstice was introduced last year, however, it lacked the firepower to back up its sex-on-wheels image. Until now. %Gallery-3953% All Photos Copyright ©2007 Damon Lavrinc / Weblogs, Inc. With close to 3,000 pounds of metal to move, the 2.4-liter Ecotec four found in the base Solstice left much to be desired, so Pontiac replaced the 177 HP mill with a direct-injected, turbocharged 2.0-liter I-4 producing 260 HP and an equal amount of torque. Peak horsepower is achieved at 5,300 RPM, while the torque curve is as flat as Bonneville from about 2,500 to 5,000 RPM. However, our seat-of-the-pants dyno suggests that those torque figures are underrated by at least ten-percent – nothing new when it comes to the General's forced-induction offerings. On the outside, there's little to indicate that this particular Solstice is anything above and beyond its base brethren. As a matter of fact, excluding the 18-inch chrome rolling stock, it's downright subdued. The naturally aspirated version's brushed metal grilles have been replaced with blacked out inserts, while the fog lamp recesses have been reshaped, broadened and painted to match. With the exception of a discreet GXP badge on the boot and a second exhaust tip, only the most hardened pistonheads will see the intercooler peering from behind the grille. Our only styling concern is for those who reside in a state that requires a front license plate, effectively turning the Solstice into a Bugs Bunny look-alike in drag. Search out pictures of the Solstice online, and you'll be hard pressed to find a shot with the top up. There's a reason for that. Our initial impression that the design lacked the refinement of other open-top offerings never really subsided, but the steep upward angle of the window line, beginning with the A-pillar and extending up towards the rear of the canvas roof, provided a subtle reminder of the chopped-top hot-rods of yore. Open the driver's side door and you're instantly reminded that this is truly an American interpretation of the roadster. It's heavy, and when it closes, the resounding "thud" is affirmation that the Solstice is no featherweight. Much has been made about the General's interior design renaissance, but the Solstice is decidedly behind the curve. The extra large dimensions of the exterior – particularly the elongated hood and bulbous badonkadonk – find their way inside and manifest themselves in a dashboard that consumes more real estate than the Donald. Most of the materials that make up the interior are of a mildly higher grade than we've seen in the past, save the top of the door panels and the area aft of the center console, which …
Full Review

2007 Solstice Overview

2007 Pontiac Solstice GXP – Click above for high-res image gallery The Pontiac Solstice is the crown prince of the General's lineup. With curves and flares, bulges and rakes, it's the modern equivalent of the Coke bottle aesthetic of yesteryear. Sure, some may prefer its sheetmetal sibling the Sky, but regardless of your chosen chariot, they're both head-turners. When the Solstice was introduced last year, however, it lacked the firepower to back up its sex-on-wheels image. Until now. %Gallery-3953% All Photos Copyright ©2007 Damon Lavrinc / Weblogs, Inc. With close to 3,000 pounds of metal to move, the 2.4-liter Ecotec four found in the base Solstice left much to be desired, so Pontiac replaced the 177 HP mill with a direct-injected, turbocharged 2.0-liter I-4 producing 260 HP and an equal amount of torque. Peak horsepower is achieved at 5,300 RPM, while the torque curve is as flat as Bonneville from about 2,500 to 5,000 RPM. However, our seat-of-the-pants dyno suggests that those torque figures are underrated by at least ten-percent – nothing new when it comes to the General's forced-induction offerings. On the outside, there's little to indicate that this particular Solstice is anything above and beyond its base brethren. As a matter of fact, excluding the 18-inch chrome rolling stock, it's downright subdued. The naturally aspirated version's brushed metal grilles have been replaced with blacked out inserts, while the fog lamp recesses have been reshaped, broadened and painted to match. With the exception of a discreet GXP badge on the boot and a second exhaust tip, only the most hardened pistonheads will see the intercooler peering from behind the grille. Our only styling concern is for those who reside in a state that requires a front license plate, effectively turning the Solstice into a Bugs Bunny look-alike in drag. Search out pictures of the Solstice online, and you'll be hard pressed to find a shot with the top up. There's a reason for that. Our initial impression that the design lacked the refinement of other open-top offerings never really subsided, but the steep upward angle of the window line, beginning with the A-pillar and extending up towards the rear of the canvas roof, provided a subtle reminder of the chopped-top hot-rods of yore. Open the driver's side door and you're instantly reminded that this is truly an American interpretation of the roadster. It's heavy, and when it closes, the resounding "thud" is affirmation that the Solstice is no featherweight. Much has been made about the General's interior design renaissance, but the Solstice is decidedly behind the curve. The extra large dimensions of the exterior – particularly the elongated hood and bulbous badonkadonk – find their way inside and manifest themselves in a dashboard that consumes more real estate than the Donald. Most of the materials that make up the interior are of a mildly higher grade than we've seen in the past, save the top of the door panels and the area aft of the center console, which …Hide Full Review