Premier 4dr Front-wheel Drive Sedan
2007 Mercury Montego

MSRP ?

$27,385
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Engine Engine 3.0LV-6
MPG MPG 21 City / 29 Hwy
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2007 Montego Overview

click above image for desktop-sized pics of the 2007 Mercury Montego Alas, Montego, we hardly knew ye. Of course, the large sedan from Mercury is not going away, but being relaunched as the Sable with a new schnoz, larger engine, and some interior upgrades. The Montego name will once again drift off into obscurity like its Torino-based forebear. While the Sable picks up where the Montego left off, it would be foolish to think the Montego is a dud. The 2007 Montego Premier AWD is a big car, with some dimensions exceeding the Grand Marquis. With a bump here and a nip there, the Montego would make the best Marquis ever. As it is, the Volvo-donated architecture underneath the Montego makes it a very modern driving sedan that belies the comfort-sized dimensions. %Gallery-2082% Criticism levelled at the Montego since it debuted in 2005 has centered on the somnambulant styling and paucity of horsepower. The Montego's looks are restrained and inoffensive. There's even a slight air of ersatz Mercedes from the back, which is one of the Montego's better angles. The bulbous front end doesn't do the car any favors in the visual distinction department, however. The fungus effect set in, though, and we began noticing little touches like the subtle crease up the center of the hood, and the bodysides unmarred by rub-strips. For such a large car, the Montego is easy to wheel around in town or parking lots. The large mirrors make parallel parking easy, and the reverse-sensing system helps you avoid the practice of parking by feel. The Volvos on this platform have dismal turning circles, equivalent to a supertanker. Not so the Montego. In Fording the platform, a little bit of front footwell was sacrificed in the interest of turning the wheels farther. You notice the slightly smaller footwells a lot less than you do the surprising agility that the change delivers. You can park this car in one shot, even in tight lots; a trick you can't always pull off with the Montego's platform-mates. It's very geeky to be enamored with how easy it is to park a car, but that agility is something you'll live with and utilize every day. Our tester came in a buttoned-to-the-collar deep gray called Alloy. Other hues raise the visual horsepower a tad, but the dark metallic paint was handsome and worked well with the cautious styling to exude a sense of decorum. The somber personality of the car's exterior carried over to the mostly black interior. Dark woodgrain trim sets off the center console, and silver accents sprinkled about bring some life to the party. The materials on the dash and door panels have a nice pattern, and they look like they will wear well. We did notice a flash line at the base of the A-pillar trim, which otherwise has the same look and texture of the dash. The headliner and visors seem a little low-rent compared with the rest of the surroundings, but you don't …
Full Review

2007 Montego Overview

click above image for desktop-sized pics of the 2007 Mercury Montego Alas, Montego, we hardly knew ye. Of course, the large sedan from Mercury is not going away, but being relaunched as the Sable with a new schnoz, larger engine, and some interior upgrades. The Montego name will once again drift off into obscurity like its Torino-based forebear. While the Sable picks up where the Montego left off, it would be foolish to think the Montego is a dud. The 2007 Montego Premier AWD is a big car, with some dimensions exceeding the Grand Marquis. With a bump here and a nip there, the Montego would make the best Marquis ever. As it is, the Volvo-donated architecture underneath the Montego makes it a very modern driving sedan that belies the comfort-sized dimensions. %Gallery-2082% Criticism levelled at the Montego since it debuted in 2005 has centered on the somnambulant styling and paucity of horsepower. The Montego's looks are restrained and inoffensive. There's even a slight air of ersatz Mercedes from the back, which is one of the Montego's better angles. The bulbous front end doesn't do the car any favors in the visual distinction department, however. The fungus effect set in, though, and we began noticing little touches like the subtle crease up the center of the hood, and the bodysides unmarred by rub-strips. For such a large car, the Montego is easy to wheel around in town or parking lots. The large mirrors make parallel parking easy, and the reverse-sensing system helps you avoid the practice of parking by feel. The Volvos on this platform have dismal turning circles, equivalent to a supertanker. Not so the Montego. In Fording the platform, a little bit of front footwell was sacrificed in the interest of turning the wheels farther. You notice the slightly smaller footwells a lot less than you do the surprising agility that the change delivers. You can park this car in one shot, even in tight lots; a trick you can't always pull off with the Montego's platform-mates. It's very geeky to be enamored with how easy it is to park a car, but that agility is something you'll live with and utilize every day. Our tester came in a buttoned-to-the-collar deep gray called Alloy. Other hues raise the visual horsepower a tad, but the dark metallic paint was handsome and worked well with the cautious styling to exude a sense of decorum. The somber personality of the car's exterior carried over to the mostly black interior. Dark woodgrain trim sets off the center console, and silver accents sprinkled about bring some life to the party. The materials on the dash and door panels have a nice pattern, and they look like they will wear well. We did notice a flash line at the base of the A-pillar trim, which otherwise has the same look and texture of the dash. The headliner and visors seem a little low-rent compared with the rest of the surroundings, but you don't …Hide Full Review