2006 Buick Lucerne

MSRP ?

$25,265 - $34,265
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Engine Engine 3.8LV-6
MPG MPG 19 City / 28 Hwy
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2006 Lucerne Overview

As always, we’ll end our review of the 2006 Buick Lucerne with a thorough account of its sporting prowess. Fortunately for us, our tester is the CXS, which is the only Lucerne model imbued with any sense of sportiness. It comes standard with the 4.6L Northstar V8, features fore and aft stabilizer bars, a fully independent suspension with Magnetic Ride Control dampers and larger 18-inch wheels. Will all that hardware be enough to justify describing the 4,013-lb. FWD Lucerne as sporty? Read on to find out. The Lucerne certainly feels like a fresh design on the surface, but underneath the skin is largely hardware that has been around the block a few times. The Lucerne is based on GM’s venerable FWD G-body platform that debuted back on the 1995 Oldsmobile Aurora and 7th generation Buick Riviera. This chassis has underpinned such players as the Buick Park Avenue, Buick LeSabre and Pontiac Bonneville since then. Currently only the Lucerne and the Cadillac DTS employ the G-body platform. The G-body and the Lucerne make a perfect pair, as the platform likes nothing more than riding into the sunset on straight highways and concealing road irregularities with its long 115.6-inch wheelbase. But this is supposed to be the Lucerne that ditches the walker for a winding country road. To that effect, all Lucerne’s feature the aforementioned front and rear stabilizer bars and an all-independent suspension with struts in front and semi-trailing arms in the rear, but the CXS gets upgraded semiactive Magnetic Ride Control dampers. The viscosity of the fluid in these shocks can change in a heartbeat to either firm up or soften damping levels in accordance with the vehicle’s load and road conditions. Techno-babble aside, they do a decent job of controlling the pitch and roll of such a large sedan. The Lucerne CXS exhibits a high level of composure when the speedo’s needle begins to rise, but don’t expect the pew-like seats to save you in a turn. Despite the fact the Lucerne can hustle down the highway and not frighten its occupants at every turn, we imagine its core audience will appreciate its sublime ride and eerily quiet interior more. Buick marketing folks have dubbed the brand’s noise isolating technology “QuietTuning”, and it not only reduces road and wind noise to a whisper but also turns the V8’s familiar rumble into the lazy purr of a large cat. Cruising around town between 35 and 65 mph is the Lucerne’s obvious element, although it’s comforting to know the car can dance when called upon. Many vehicles would stand in line for a tango partner like the Northstar V8, as this high-tech powerplant has more than proven itself a worthy motivator. A supercharged 4.4L version of the Northstar was chosen for duty in the most power Cadillac ever, the STS-V, where it produces remarkable amounts of power, 469 hp and 439 ft-lbs of torque. The Lucerne’s 4.6L Northstar goes without a blower, but the extra displacement helps create a torque curve …
Full Review

2006 Lucerne Overview

As always, we’ll end our review of the 2006 Buick Lucerne with a thorough account of its sporting prowess. Fortunately for us, our tester is the CXS, which is the only Lucerne model imbued with any sense of sportiness. It comes standard with the 4.6L Northstar V8, features fore and aft stabilizer bars, a fully independent suspension with Magnetic Ride Control dampers and larger 18-inch wheels. Will all that hardware be enough to justify describing the 4,013-lb. FWD Lucerne as sporty? Read on to find out. The Lucerne certainly feels like a fresh design on the surface, but underneath the skin is largely hardware that has been around the block a few times. The Lucerne is based on GM’s venerable FWD G-body platform that debuted back on the 1995 Oldsmobile Aurora and 7th generation Buick Riviera. This chassis has underpinned such players as the Buick Park Avenue, Buick LeSabre and Pontiac Bonneville since then. Currently only the Lucerne and the Cadillac DTS employ the G-body platform. The G-body and the Lucerne make a perfect pair, as the platform likes nothing more than riding into the sunset on straight highways and concealing road irregularities with its long 115.6-inch wheelbase. But this is supposed to be the Lucerne that ditches the walker for a winding country road. To that effect, all Lucerne’s feature the aforementioned front and rear stabilizer bars and an all-independent suspension with struts in front and semi-trailing arms in the rear, but the CXS gets upgraded semiactive Magnetic Ride Control dampers. The viscosity of the fluid in these shocks can change in a heartbeat to either firm up or soften damping levels in accordance with the vehicle’s load and road conditions. Techno-babble aside, they do a decent job of controlling the pitch and roll of such a large sedan. The Lucerne CXS exhibits a high level of composure when the speedo’s needle begins to rise, but don’t expect the pew-like seats to save you in a turn. Despite the fact the Lucerne can hustle down the highway and not frighten its occupants at every turn, we imagine its core audience will appreciate its sublime ride and eerily quiet interior more. Buick marketing folks have dubbed the brand’s noise isolating technology “QuietTuning”, and it not only reduces road and wind noise to a whisper but also turns the V8’s familiar rumble into the lazy purr of a large cat. Cruising around town between 35 and 65 mph is the Lucerne’s obvious element, although it’s comforting to know the car can dance when called upon. Many vehicles would stand in line for a tango partner like the Northstar V8, as this high-tech powerplant has more than proven itself a worthy motivator. A supercharged 4.4L version of the Northstar was chosen for duty in the most power Cadillac ever, the STS-V, where it produces remarkable amounts of power, 469 hp and 439 ft-lbs of torque. The Lucerne’s 4.6L Northstar goes without a blower, but the extra displacement helps create a torque curve …Hide Full Review