2004 Toyota Tundra Reviews

2004 Tundra New Car Test Drive

Introduction

The Toyota Tundra is available in a new four-door crew cab model for 2004 called the Double Cab. The Double Cab features a deep, six-foot bed and brings Toyota closer to having a true full-size pickup: The Double Cab is three inches taller, four inches wider, and is built on a longer chassis than the other Tundra pickups. With the addition of the Double Cab, the Tundra is now available in regular cab, extended cab, and crew cab bodies. 

Though classified as full-size, the Tundra models are not as big as the Nissan Titan, Ford F-150, Dodge Ram, Chevrolet Silverado, and GMC Sierra models. Toyota makes up for this in other ways. The Tundra feels lighter on its feet, more agile and more refined than the domestic trucks. The Tundra is quick and responsive. And it's built to Toyota's high standard of quality, durability and reliability. 

The Tundra is one of the smoothest, quietest, and most refined pickups we've driven. Its 4.7-liter V8 engine is exceptional, with enough power to run with the big dogs. A properly equipped Tundra can tow up to 7,100 pounds or haul up to 1,800 pounds. A V6 engine is available, and there's a bare-bones work truck that starts at $15,955. 

Lineup

Toyota Tundra is available as a two-door Regular Cab, an extended Access Cab with auxiliary rear doors, and the new Double Cab. Two- and four-wheel-drive versions are offered, employing similar suspensions and bed heights. Three trim levels are available: base, SR5, and Limited. Access Cab buyers can choose a full-width or stepside bed. 

Two engines are available: The double-overhead-cam, 32-valve 4.7-liter V8 produces 240 horsepower and 315 foot-pounds of torque and comes with a four-speed automatic transmission. The double-overhead-cam 3.4-liter V6 is rated at 190 horsepower and 220 foot-pounds of torque; it comes with a choice of four-speed automatic or five-speed manual transmission. 

Base models are pretty plain, and come only with the Regular Cab, V6, and two-wheel drive ($15,955). A five-speed manual is standard, but it's also available with an automatic ($16,795). Bumpers are painted. Air conditioning ($985) is optional. Anti-lock brakes (ABS) are standard. 

SR5 models offer the option of an Access Cab ($21,365), a Double Cab ($25,645), and four-wheel drive. SR5 models come standard with air conditioning, cruise control, AM/FM/cassette stereo, tilt steering, tachometer, color-keyed front and chromed rear bumper, styled steel wheels, and other trim upgrades. The V6 and five-speed manual are standard, but an automatic is available. SR5s are also available with the V8 and automatic. 

Limited models come standard with the V8, and are available in Access Cab ($27,075) or Double Cab ($29,270). The Limited's long list of standard equipment includes an in-dash CD changer, steering-wheel-mounted audio controls, keyless entry, and an anti-theft system. Limited models also get a power rear window. 

The step-side is available only on V8 Access Cabs in SR5 ($24,295) or Limited ($27,825) trim. A Sport Suspension Package for 2WD V8 models features Tokico shocks, springs tuned for handling, and a 3.916:1 limited-slip differential. Graphite-tone 17-inch alloy wheels wear P265/65R17 tires. 

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