iT Sport 4dr Station Wagon
2000 BMW 323 Reviews

2000 323 New Car Test Drive


No matter the body style, the BMW 3 Series is the prototypical driving enthusiast's car. This is precision machinery. These cars corner, accelerate and stop swiftly. They turn winding roads into amusement parks. They put drivers in touch with the road instead of isolating them. At the same time, they are highly refined sedans that provide comfort and a strong sense of well being while cruising along. Occupants are treated to elegant, businesslike interiors. Completely redesigned just last year, BMW's 3 Series is roomier, smoother and quieter than ever. 

So whether you choose a sedan, coupe, convertible or sport wagon, you've chosen a car you can love for as long as you own it. 


3 Series is the smallest of BMW's three sedan lines. A pair of new coupes was launched last summer as 2000 models. Though based on the same platform (chassis and drive train) as the sedans, the new coupe body shares few body panels with the sedans. 

Prices for the 2000 models (including $570 destination charge): 323i Sedan ($27,560); 328i Sedan ($33,970); 323Ci Coupe ($29,560); 328Ci Coupe ($34,560). New this spring: the 323Ci Convertible ($34,990) designed for alfresco motoring and a cool 323i Sport Wagon ($29,770). Look for a powerful new M3 within the next year. 

BMW's 2.5-liter six-cylinder engine delivers 170-horsepower to the rear wheels of the 323i Sedan, 323Ci Coupe, 323Ci Convertible and 323i Sport Wagon. A 2.8-liter inline-6 rated at 193 horsepower generates thrust for the 328i Sedan and 328Ci Coupe. We love the 5-speed manual, but a superb 5-speed automatic is an option ($1200 or $1275 for the Steptronic). 

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