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Researchers at Washington State University have made a discovery they're calling "the most condensed form of energy storage outside of nuclear energy." And if they're right, it could one day lead to super-energy-dense batteries. The process uses tools and materials that sound like things Lex Luthor or a Bond villian might have laying around in the basement.


The BP oil spill has reminded us that whether we love ethanol or hate it, it's still loads better than crude oil. Or at least that's what the corn ethanol lobbies would have us believe, according to Slate.


BP and the US government haven't been as forthcoming with details about the company's oil spill as some of us would like. Lack of clear information often breeds speculation, and what follows is certainly speculation. That being said, those of us who write for ABG and you, our readers, often deal with absolutes: the most efficient battery design, the fastest charge time, the largest miles-per-gallon number. So we can't help but wonder, what is the absolute worst case scenario for the BP oil spill


Yokohama Electric EV Sports Concept HER-02 – click above for hi-res image


Mayors from across the country gathered in Oklahoma City this past weekend for the U.S. Conference of Mayors. Their agenda covered everything from federal immigration reform and after-school programs to drug enforcement and Superfund sites. It was a busy weekend.


Okay, we admit it, we're as smitten by emerging and flashy technology as much as the next green geeks. But sometimes we get so caught up in the vehicles of tomorrow that we forget to look back at the incredibly green vehicles that have come before. One of the best – and most lampooned – was the Geo Metro.


Back in the early days of mass-produced biofuels, corn-based ethanol and soy-based biodiesel were all the rage. But criticism about food vs. fuel and scalability abounded and, by 2008, cellulosic ethanol became known as a so-called second-generation-biofuel and, maybe, the answer to our oil-addicted prayers. Blame Congress, blame the economy, heck, blame T. Boone Pickens if you want to, but the fact of the matter is that in the two years since cellulosic ethanol's big appearance, large-scale pro


Physarum polycephalum, slime mold, makes map of U.S. – check out the videos after the jump


The good people over at Edmunds Inside Line maintain a fleet of test vehicles for their flogging pleasure. And they've just released the latest fuel economy numbers from their real-world tests. Not surprisingly, the 2004 Toyota Prius came in first place overall averaging 41.0 miles per gallon. What is surprising is that, while the Prius was able to squeeze out 59.3 miles-per-gallon on the high end, the same car also returned 26.7 mpg on its worst tank. What on earth do you have to do to a Prius


var digg_url = 'http://green.autoblog.com/2010/06/02/house-passes-biodiesel-tax-credit-bill-moves-on-to-senate/'; Since late 2009, commercial biodiesel producers and users across the U.S. have been wandering through the diesel desert, shamefully living off petroleum, thirsting for just one more drop of renewable fuel to put in our tanks. That's because last December, Congress allowed the biodiesel tax credit, an incentive that helped make biodiesel cost-competitive with petroleum diesel, to


Ken Block and his 2011 Ford Fiesta – Click above to check out the video after the jump


The new UK government is looking to cut costs – and a £5,000 discount on all new electric cars could be on the chopping block, according to the Guardian. The budding UK electric vehicle (EV) market, much like the EV market in the U.S., is heavily dependent on tax breaks and rebates to keep the vehicles' final sticker prices competitive with conventional models. In England, the Nissan Leaf is priced at £23,350 after the £5,000 discount. According to Kieren Puffett, a used-


No one is saying start-stop technology like the kind found in electric and hybrid vehicles isn't a great idea. We just told you about how BMW's 320d EfficientDynamics model is able to squeeze over 1000 miles out of a tank of diesel in part due to start-stop tech, for example. It's awesome, no doubt.


For weeks, oil has been gushing into the Gulf of Mexico at a rate of somewhere between 5,000 and 47 zillion barrels a day and BP still has no clear plan to stop it. Now, everyone from the U.S. Government to Kevin Costner to those fellas down in Florida with the hay are doing their part to clean up the mess. Add to that list a group of young graphic designers who got together in Belfast, Maine recently to shave the heads of townspeople and make hair booms to help sop up the crude.


Despite proponents like T. Boone Pickens pushing for compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles on America roads, the simple fact is, outside of states like California and Florida, a CNG-powered vehicle just isn't practical. Or is it? As part of her Master's Degree thesis, Castlen Kennedy, a student at the University of Texas in Austin, is driving a CNG-powered Chevy Tahoe from Texas to Boston, MA in the hopes of spreading the word about CNG and meeting some of the people who are already involved w


It's been a while since Ford produced vehicles with wood as a primary building material, or even as a dashboard accent. So you wouldn't really think of Ford as being a big consumer of virgin timber. But what about millions, literally millions of owners manuals, warranty booklets, sales brochures and even internal corporate-printed pieces? It all adds up to a virtual forest. So, Ford has announced plans to cut down on its tree-cutting.

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