• Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
The Porsche 928 was intended to be a replacement for the 911, but the all-too-familiar howls of outrage from Porsche zealots meant that the rear-engined car stayed in the lineup during the 928's entire 1978-1995 production run and to the present day. You hear a lot of talk these days about every example of the 928 being worth big bucks, no matter how trashed, but I still see quite a few in the cheap self-service wrecking yards of the American West. Here's an '80, found in a San Francisco Bay Area yard not long ago.



In 1980, this aluminum-block, SOHC, 4.5-liter V8 made 220 horsepower. This doesn't sound like much by 2017 standards, but 220 horses was plenty during the year in which the California-spec Corvette had just 180.



This car wins the Coolest-Looking Intake Manifold award for its era, and maybe for all time. I thought about buying this one, but I already have one bolted to my garage wall.



This one has the look of a car that sat in a driveway or back yard for a couple of decades, finally coming to this place when its last owner realized just how much it costs to get one of these cars fixed. The value difference between a nice early 928 and a beater early 928 is a five-digit figure.



This one got picked over hard by owners of 928 projects, and most of the electronic stuff plus the rear-mounted transaxle are long gone.



The MSRP on a new 1980 Porsche 928 was $37,930. That's just a bit under $120,000 in inflation-adjusted 2017 dollars, and not much cheaper than a new 1980 Ferrari 308. Depreciation of European luxury cars can be a cruelly steep curve. How much was a new 1980 Porsche 911SC coupe? $27,700.

Nothing even comes close.

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