ETC
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
The first-generation Ford Taurus SHO was an impressive machine when it debuted in 1989. While the ordinary '89 Taurus had a 140-horse V6 as its most powerful engine, the Taurus SHO boasted a very nervous Yamaha-designed DOHC V6 howling out 220 horses. Most of these cars were hooned to death many years ago, but here's one that I spotted in a Denver self-service wrecking yard, not long ago.



This is one of the coolest-looking intake manifolds of all time. I keep meaning to grab one at the junkyard and display it on my garage wall, alongside the even-cooler-looking Porsche 928 intake that's already there.



A 5-speed manual transmission was mandatory in all Taurus SHOs built for the 1989 through 1992 model years. The last year for a manual transmission in the non-SHO Taurus was 1988, and even that was available only with the miserable 88-horsepower four-cylinder engine. I have been searching for one of these cars in wrecking yards for years and have yet to see one.



Sold new in Denver, will be crushed in Denver.



"Just when they thought they had you all figured out."

Related Video:

From Our Partners

You May Like
Links by Zergnet

Questions

There are no questions about this topic.
Be the first to ask!
Share This Photo X