Tesla Model S Autopilot dashboard
  • Tesla Model S Autopilot dashboard
  • Tesla Model S Autopilot dashboard
  • Image Credit: Tesla Motors
Tesla Model S Autopilot high-precision maps
  • Tesla Model S Autopilot high-precision maps
  • Tesla Model S Autopilot high-precision maps
  • Image Credit: Tesla Motors
Tesla Model S Autopilot sensors
  • Tesla Model S Autopilot sensors
  • Tesla Model S Autopilot sensors
  • Image Credit: Tesla Motors
Tesla Model S Autopilot sensors
  • Tesla Model S Autopilot sensors
  • Tesla Model S Autopilot sensors
  • Image Credit: Tesla Motors
Tesla Model S Autopilot - autopark
  • Tesla Model S Autopilot - autopark
  • Tesla Model S Autopilot - autopark
  • Image Credit: Tesla Motors
Tesla Motors may start sharing data from its cars' Autopilot feature with the US Department of Transportation, Electrek reports. It's not part of a quid pro quo to get the feds to allow Tesla to sell cars directly to consumers, but it may be part of a plan to speed up approval by US regulators of fully autonomous driving.

Tesla chief Elon Musk has offered to share data from the Autopilot systems in the Tesla Model S electric sedans, Electrek says. As of last month, Autopilot racked up 780 million miles worth of data to share, and that number continues to increase by 25 million miles a day. Musk says the auto industry is less than two years away from selling a vehicle with "complete autonomy," but, of course, the federal government has to allow such a thing. Tesla confirmed to Autoblog on Friday that Musk made the offer at the company's shareholder meeting earlier this week, and Musk's comments also implied sharing data with other automakers.

"On a statistical basis, we don't have any issues with them sharing that with other manufacturers," he said. "We're very sensitive about that on an individual car basis, but on a statistical basis that's an offer we've already made to the department of transport. So we want to be helpful."

One thing neither Musk nor the DOT have in mind is the idea of drivers taking a snooze while their Teslas are on Autopilot, which apparently happened, according to a video posted last week. Meanwhile, a few accidents — none major — involving Teslas that may or may not have been on Autopilot and failed to brake in time have stirred up continued debates over both the legalization and driver responsibility of driving systems that make cars progressively more autonomous.

Related Video:

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