This post is appearing on Autoblog Military, Autoblog's sub-site dedicated to the vehicles, aircraft and ships of the world's armed forces.

By now, you've probably heard about the RRS Boaty McBoatface, the top candidate in a public poll to name the United Kingdom's Natural Environment Research Council's new arctic research ship. The NERC is quickly learning that you shouldn't trust the internet to name anything, let alone a boat. Other entertaining suggestions include RRS Big Metal Floaty Thingy-Thing and RRS Usain Boat. Now, the US Air Force has made a similar mistake.

The USAF has opened a virtual suggestion box on its website to give the new B-21 stealth bomber a nickname. The idea is to find a fitting title for the latest stealth bomber, along the lines of the B-2 Spirit and B-1 Lancer. But this is the internet, which the Air Force seems to have forgotten after sending out a tweet asking for suggestions.

Naturally, there were countless riffs on the Boaty McBoatface – highlights include the obvious Bomby McBombface and the all-together more creative Stealthy McHidden – but there were also some uniquely American suggestions. We got a chuckle out of Barack Obomber, Deathkill Eaglehawk Firebird Hoora! Testosterone 1, The Flat Bastard, Hell Pigeon, and Bob. But there were also a number of suggestions that were far sharper critiques of the Air Force, American military, and the current military industrial complex. One Twitter user suggested the B-21 Obsolete, the B-21 Why College Isn't Free, and the Blown Billions.

We've embedded the Air Force's tweet so you can check out all the suggestions. Not that they matter, of course. Likely the only suggestions Uncle Sam will consider will be those submitted on the official Air Force Global Strike Command website, and you can't make a suggestion unless you're on active duty, a reservist, a dependent, or a retiree with the Air Force, a member of the Air National Guard, or a member of the Air Force Civil Service.


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