Volkswagen brand chairman Herbert Diess used part of his keynote address during the Consumer Electronics Show to apologize for the automaker's software defeat device that circumvented diesel emissions rules. "We disappointed our customers and the American people, for which I am truly sorry, and for which I apologize," Diess said during the speech, according to The Los Angeles Times.

Diess also claimed that the company was "disappointed" that the emissions evasions happened and reiterated the company's plan to fix the problem. "I assure you we are doing everything we can to make things right and we are working night and day to find effective technical remedies for our customers and authorities worldwide," he said, The LA Times reported.

VW tried to show a greener side at CES with the unveiling of the Budd-e van concept. The electric vehicle has styling that evokes the classic VW Microbus, but it uses the automaker's next-gen scalable platform. The model's flat batteries run under the floor, and they could offer an estimated range of 233 miles.

Diess' public apology joins several others from VW Group execs since news of the emissions scandal broke in September. Shortly before his resignation, former CEO Martin Winterkorn issued a video to say sorry for the company's actions. VW Group of America boss Michael Horn also used his speech during the LA Auto Show to acknowledge the automaker's problems.

VW still has a lot of work ahead to solve the diesel emissions issues. The company needs approval from US regulators before it can begin recalling vehicles, and the California Air Resources Board could have a decision by January 14. A recent lawsuit by the Department of Justice for Clean Air Act violations might also result in billions in fines against VW as punishment for the cheating the rules.

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