• Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
Aston Martin is working on something called Aeroblade, and the company recently filed a trademark application for the name. According to AutoGuide, the paperwork suggests the name could be used for a component, not for a model designation. The word indicates some kind of aerodynamic element, potentially in the form of an adaptive wing like those seen on the McLaren 650S, Bugatti Veyron, and so many Porsches over the years. Deployable spoilers allow a sports car to keep the airflow clean and undisturbed in some conditions and generate extra downforce under others.

The use of the Aeroblade name for a component makes more sense than an actual model name. Aston typically starts its nameplates either with the letter V (as in Vanquish or the Vulcan pictured above) or DB (as in the current DB9 or forthcoming DB11). It has been known to make exceptions – like in the case of the Rapide four-door coupe or Cygnet city car – so we could be in for a surprise.

The British manufacturer of luxury vehicles is working on a new generation of models to replace its current lineup. That includes a new platform to replace the aging VH architecture and a new engine under development with Mercedes-AMG. It's also working on bringing its first crossover to production, as previewed by the DBX concept at the Geneva Motor Show.

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