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A new poll suggests interest in EVs has changed very little in the past two years. A recent Harris Poll repeating the same questions from 2013 shows that 21 percent of consumers would consider battery electric vehicles (up from 19 percent in 2013) while 29 percent would consider buying a plug-in hybrid (up from 27 percent). 48 percent would consider a hybrid, the same number as 2013. Price and range top the list of concerns for potential customers, followed by maintenance costs, reliability and performance, in that order. Millennials are the most likely age demographic to consider an electrified vehicle, at 57 percent. Read more at Charged EVs.

A blog post from Fully Charged explores the guilt of driving a Tesla Model S. To the author, Robert Llewellyn - who now identifies as a "middle-class-English-lefty," but you may know him as an actor - the privilege of driving an expensive luxury sedan across Europe is somewhat troubling. "I'm wrangling with hypocrisy, self-loathing and the conviction that inequality is a massive problem and I'm part of that problem," he says. Some facts, though, ease his guilt: his trip in the Model S has a relatively low carbon footprint, and as EVs become more prolific, it will eventually cease to be "such an icon." Furthermore, Llewellyn's entire career helps inform and change the way people think about electric vehicles. As such, many (including at least one commenter) would call the Model S experience a reward rather than a privilege. Read more at Fully Charged.

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has announced $10 million in funding for projects to make vehicles more efficient and environmentally friendly. The goal is to achieve greater freedom of mobility, reduce the environmental impact of driving and to create energy security for the US by reducing petroleum use. The projects include one to produce high-voltage EV batteries through advanced stable electrolytes and another to develop new lightweight, high-strength alloys. Read more from the DOE.

Turns out, the EPA/NHTSA Phase 2 truck efficiency standards fall short of the DOE's SuperTruck goals. Analysis from the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) shows that SuperTruck technology is more advanced than what the EPA asks for, and will only be used on a limited scale in the Phase 2 regulations. EPA targets for 2027 are peak brake thermal efficiency of about 49 percent (SuperTruck has achieved over 50 percent), 37-percent aerodynamic improvement (Daimler's SuperTruck achieved a 54 percent improvement) and a 33-percent better fuel economy (SuperTruck program saw 40- to 50-percent improvements). A number of SuperTruck technologies, such as solar panels, hybridization, cab insulation, LED lighting, and electric turbocharging, will not be required in the Phase 2 standards. Read more at DieselNet.

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