• Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
Most of the supercars on the market come from large auto groups capable (at least in theory) of trickling their technological developments down to more ordinary cars. Ferrari, Lamborghini, Bugatti, Porsche... these all belong to larger groups, and of course vehicles like the Ford GT, Acura NSX, and Dodge Viper (to name just a few) are made by mainstream automakers. Koenigsegg, on the other hand, is independent, and doesn't make anything other than seven-figure hypercars. That could, however, change in the near future.

In a recent interview, Christian von Koenigsegg suggested that he and his company are keen to apply their expertise to more accessible vehicles. "Within our company there could be room to start utilising all the technological developments we have created, and trickle them down into more normal cars," Koenigsegg told CarThrottle.com. Does that mean that the Swedish supercar manufacturer will sell itself out to a larger auto group, or start slapping its name on more budget-friendly automobiles? Hardly. "I think the brand Koenigsegg should stay in this rarified area and make these extreme machines and keep on pushing the limit." He did, however, open the door to a couple of intriguing possibilities.

On the one hand, Koenigsegg could launch a separate sub-brand to bring less expensive machinery to market. Alternatively, it could start collaborating on projects with other, more mainstream automakers. The latter possibility may not be as outlandish as it may seem at first when you consider that exotic automakers like Lotus and Porsche have consulted extensively for other carmakers, and that many of those supercar brands within larger groups that we mentioned earlier have been tapped by their parent companies to help other brands develop more mass-market models.

One thing's for sure: Koenigsegg has a lot of expertise to offer. It has pioneered a number of new technologies – from the direct-drive hybrid system in the Regera to the 3D-printed titanium exhaust in the One:1 – and has managed to out-perform hypercars developed by much larger and better-financed automakers... ones that could stand to take a page or two out of Christian's playbook.

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