• Image Credit: David Brown Automotive
  • Image Credit: David Brown Automotive
  • Image Credit: David Brown Automotive
  • Image Credit: David Brown Automotive
  • Image Credit: David Brown Automotive
  • Image Credit: David Brown Automotive
  • Image Credit: David Brown Automotive
  • Image Credit: David Brown Automotive
  • Image Credit: David Brown Automotive
  • Image Credit: David Brown Automotive
  • Image Credit: David Brown Automotive
  • Image Credit: David Brown Automotive
  • Image Credit: David Brown Automotive
  • Image Credit: David Brown Automotive
  • Image Credit: David Brown Automotive
  • Image Credit: David Brown Automotive
  • Image Credit: David Brown Automotive
  • Image Credit: David Brown Automotive
Automakers don't make the entire cars themselves. They typically design and engineer them, outsource many of the components to outside suppliers, and put them together at assembly plants. Farming out work to those suppliers can result in some leaks in the automaker's intellectual property, but while that's typically covered in extensive legal documents, disputes can arise. And in this case, it's arisen between Aston Martin and one of its suppliers.

That supplier is the Envisage Group, a British firm based in Coventry that has, among its various clients, performed design work for Aston since 2007 and supplied parts and tooling since 2011. That means it has access to certain proprietary information regarding Aston and its products, and now the automaker is claiming the supplier has taken unlawful advantage of that access and its copyrights to further its other businesses.

Among its other services, Envisage operates a coachbuilding operation that handles the production of vehicles like the Eagle's customized Jaguar E-Types and the Speedback GT for David Brown Automotive. The latter, pictured here, bears more than a passing resemblance to classic Astons, and the company name itself suggests a certain affiliation as well. However both Aston Martin and David Brown Automotive insist that the lawsuit is unrelated. In correspondence with Autoblog, the latter sent the following statement:

Following speculation in recent press reports that David Brown Automotive and Speedback GT are the subject of, or involved in, legal proceedings by Aston Martin Lagonda Limited against Envisage Group Limited, David Brown Automotive can confirm that it, and its products, are in no way implicated and the production of our vehicles continues unaffected by the litigation.


According to the report from the Telegraph, the lawsuit filed with the UK's High Court makes specific mention of badges, wheels and headlights belonging to Aston Martin that Envisage has allegedly used in promoting its services.

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