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Like Ray Charles, Plug In America's Michael Thwaite has Georgia on his mind. Thwaite is putting out the call on behalf of the electric-vehicle advocacy group to get people to stop the state's plug-in vehicle incentives from going the way of Atlanta Flames. And he's using math that may or may not be funny.

Thwaite's public enemy Number One is Chuck Martin (R-Alpharetta), who's pushing legislation (specifically, House Bill 122) to wipe out the $5,000 tax credit (one of the highest among US states). Martin is also said to have more than 60 state legislators backing him up. Thwaite says that the money is well spent, since each electric vehicle keeps more than $2,200 from being spent outside the state by getting folks to charge up through local utilities instead of paying for gas imported from those darned oil-rich nations.

Last year, Martin proposed a bill (HB 257) that would cap incentive-generating EVs in the state at about 2,000 units a year, but state legislators ran out of time before taking a vote on it, so the issue got tabled for another year. And that year is almost up. The issue is far from academic, since Atlanta remains a city that generates some of the highest Nissan Leaf sales in the country – largely because of those state incentives. Check out Mr. Thwaite's note below.

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Don't Let Georgia State Incentives for Electric Vehicles Disappear

The state of Georgia has enjoyed tremendous support for electric vehicle adoption from its legislators, but that is at risk. Georgia legislators need to hear your voice in favor of electric car incentives.

Chuck Martin (R-Alpharetta) is introducing legislation (House Bill 122) to eliminate the state electric vehicle tax credits of $5,000. He has already amassed more that 60 legislators to support the bill. We need you to let them know that the public supports EVs!

Georgia has become a beacon for electric vehicle sales. The tax credit has helped make Georgia the national leader in Nissan LEAF sales, an electric car built here in the US.

Please take a moment to complete the action below to ensure that your representative hears your voice to maintain the EV incentives and defeat this bill.

Georgia's Public Service Commission member Tim Echols argued passionately for keeping the credits. Aside from the environmental benefits and the positive message sent to millennials about the importance of moving away from polluting fossil fuels, he makes a powerful economic argument.

"For every 1 percent of petroleum-based miles displaced by electric vehicles in Georgia, approximately $201 million dollars remain in the state annually. Each pure electric vehicle keeps $2,242 a year in state by fueling with electricity rather than petroleum-based products. For a state without a single oil well or refinery, this is huge."

Please join us in calling for the house to support continued state incentives for electric vehicles by filling out the form below.

Thank you,
Michael Thwaite
Plug In America


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