The first public auction of surplus US Army Humvees has came and went, and to call it a rousing success would be a major understatement. Auctioneers IronPlanet Inc., unloaded 25 trucks on behalf of the Department of Defense's Defense Logistics Agency.

Bidding started at a meager $10,000 for the privilege of driving home in America's most iconic military vehicle. With $744,000 changing hands, the average Humvee crossed the block for just under $30,000, while the highest winning bid was $41,000, for a 1994 vintage, and the lowest winning price was $21,500, Military.com reports.

If those prices seem a smidge low, it's because they are. A quick check of AutoTrader revealed that, nationwide, the cheapest Hummer H1 was up for grabs for $31,300, while the most expensive, a 2006 H1 Alpha, was going for $149,995.

Of course, there's a good reason you might want to consider the civilian model, as Military.com explains it. AM General, the Humvee's manufacturer, is pretty unequivocal on its website, saying, "The Humvee was designed for a military mission and was not designed to meet civilian safety standards." It gets worse, though.

"AM General does not endorse nor support the sale of these military vehicles to the general public or private entities. AM General further opposes any use of these military vehicles by individuals or entities outside of the military context for which the vehicles are designed. AM General does not sell the military vehicle or service parts for the military vehicle to the general public."

Somehow, though, we doubt that will stop those that are truly interested in the brutish military vehicle. The 25 Humvees sold in this first auction had simply been gathering dust at Utah's Hill Air Force Base, according to Military.com. Considering this auction's success, and the fact that there are apparently 4,000 more surplus Humvees sitting about, we doubt this will be the last time the military turns to auction houses to unload inventory.

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