• Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
Roel de Vries, the corporate vice president and global head of marketing and brand strategy for Nissan, told Australia's CarAdvice that as far as he's concerned, any engine in the 370Z "[needs] to deliver on what the car stands for and if the 370Z stands for real performance and real driving I think it doesn't need a V6 to do that." At first read, it could look like de Vries is softening us up for a next-generation Z that doesn't come with a V6, a move that would disappoint a lot of the coupe's fans.

Or, what if de Vries was actually getting us ready for a Z with multiple engine options, instead of only a V6, in order to expand its global appeal? That appeared to be the gist of his comments, the exec saying that they couldn't sell a V6-engined Z in Europe, but even if they offer a four-cylinder there, the V6 could live on because, "why should we give it up?" With the coupe's current name a factor of the 3.7-liter displacement of it's V6, though, what is the future for a car with several engine options? Said de Vries, "We [will] definitely keep the Z name, but when we did 350 to 370 it was because of the capacity, but who says the next-generation doesn't have three engines and its not just called Z?"

This kind of talk has been going on all year, the real question being how many engines will the car get and what's the endgame. At the beginning of the year, ex product chief Andy Palmer said the car codenamed Z35 would use a "downsized four-cylinder turbocharged engine." In August, Motor Trend reported that the next Z would offer "a mixture of smaller but powerful engines," including a hybrid, but that a V6 would remain the headliner. Two weeks later, MT said that Nissan wanted to transition customers from the naturally aspirated V6 to a turbocharged four-cylinder with the same power, eventually, but would begin with both on the menu. Parallel to that are Shiro Nakamura's out-loud musings about how to merge the next Z and the IDx concepts into "a more affordable, more approachable sports car." The answers, whatever they are, will be a big deal for the brand.


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