• Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
When a car is worth millions of dollars, you don't simply write it off when it's damaged – you have it painstakingly repaired. But when that car's worth tens of millions, there's hardly any expense to be spared in its restoration. So after a rare Ferrari 250 GTO crashed a couple of years ago during a special event, its owner (presumably at the behest of his insurance company) sent the damaged specimen back to the factory for a full restoration to its original condition.

The Ferrari in question, GTO No. 3445, is owned by American collector Christopher Cox, who was driving it during a special tour in France organized for the legendary sports racer's 50th anniversary when he collided with another car – fortunately not another one of the GTOs on the road – inflicting significant damage on the highly coveted collector's item.

That was two-and-a-half years ago, and shortly after the accident, Cox entrusted it to the Ferrari Classiche division, which is responsible for restoring classic Prancing Horses and certifying their authenticity. Now the repairs and restoration are complete, right down to the Swedish blue and yellow livery it was originally give in April 1963 by Ulf Norinder and the number 112 he gave it for the 1964 Targa Florio.

Spending over two years restoring a single automobile may seem like overkill to most, but considering the $52 million said to have been paid the last time a GTO traded hands, and the $30 million spent on the one before that, suddenly two years doesn't seem like that long after all. Watch the reconditioned car undergoing its final, post-restoration shakedown around the Fiorano circuit in the video below.
Show full PR text
Lady in Blue
A stunning 250 GTO is restored by the Classiche department

Maranello, 28 November 2014 – One of the stars of the tracks of the 1960s was a Ferrari 250 GTO which has just emerged from a two-year-plus renovation at the Ferrari Classiche department, ready to return to its owner in America. During its stay in Maranello, the car was restored to the original engine and bodywork configuration in which it was delivered to Bologna-based publisher Luciano Conti in 1962. The latter also drove it in its maiden race, the Bologna-Passo della Raticosa.

The Volpi era. In June 1962, however, Chassis no. 3445 was sold to Count Giovanni Volpi di Misurata, a passionate racing driver, who competed under the S.S.S. Repubblica di Venezia insignia. During this particular stage of its career, the car also won the Trophée d'Auvergne with Carlo Maria Abate at its wheel.

A change of livery. In April 1963, the 250 GTO was purchased by Swede Ulf Norinder who, to comply with the racing regulations of the day, changed its livery from the original red to blue and yellow colours of Sweden. Mr Norinder then drove it to victory in the Vastkustloppet in his home nation. The car also finished second twice in the Targa Florio (with Bordeu and Scarlatti in 1963, and 1964 with Norinder and Pico Troiberg, the latter time as no. 112 which it still bears today). It subsequently changed hands several times before being sent to the Classiche department in 2012 to be restored to its original splendour. That process now complete, the 250 GTO once again sports the Swedish colours and is back with its owner.

I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • Share This Photo X