There's a lot of EV love going on in Slovenia. While we've heard about the country's biofuel work before, the electric vehicle scene has thus far escaped our radar. This will no longer be the case, thanks to the work of Andrej Pecjak and the crew at the Metron Institut.

Recently, Pacjak and his partner Jasna drove an electric car – a converted Mazda5 – from Bled (in Sloveniva) to Dubrovnik (in Croatia), a distance of 736 kilometers, without recharging. That's 457 miles on everyday roads in everyday traffic while loaded up with "all necessary luggage" and covering at least 5,000 meters of elevation changes up the Adriatic coast. The duo drove on some highways, but the overall average speed was an easy 40 miles per hour (roughly). "As far as we now nobody has ever driven so far without charging in normal traffic conditions," the Institut wrote.

The exact technology used in the conversion is not being disclosed (at least, not in English on the site), but Metron is saying that the conversion uses "96 lithium polymer chobalt (sic) based cells stored in special light boxes under the car" for its battery. Throw in a lightweight Letrika IPM motor and controller and Metron claims that "efficiency is so high that when driving up to 80 km/h [50 mph] we do not need any air intakes for cooling (we have a patented cooling system)." We can't verify any of this, but it certainly appears like the trip was a real success.

Pacjak himself is no stranger to EV conversions. Below, you can see two short clips of him scooting on electrons in a Smart Roadster (the "Superpiki") and an old, converted Fortwo (the "Smart Piki").





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