• Image Credit: Dodge
  • Image Credit: Dodge
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  • Image Credit: Dodge
  • Image Credit: Dodge
  • Image Credit: Dodge
  • Image Credit: Dodge
  • Image Credit: Dodge
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  • Image Credit: Dodge
  • Image Credit: Dodge
  • Image Credit: Dodge
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  • Image Credit: Dodge
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  • Image Credit: Dodge
  • Image Credit: Dodge
  • Image Credit: Dodge
  • Image Credit: Dodge
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  • Image Credit: Dodge
  • Image Credit: Dodge
  • Image Credit: Dodge
  • Image Credit: Dodge
  • Image Credit: Dodge
  • Image Credit: Dodge
Lawsuits are an unfortunate part of doing business in just about any industry, so the latest complaint filed by a California-based aftermarket firm against Chrysler would seem to be nothing more than business as usual. But this isn't the first time the two companies have sparred over this particular issue.

According to a report from Automotive News, the dispute revolves around the Scat Pack name that Chrysler first offered on the Charger, Coronet, Dart and Super Bee starting in 1968. Scat Enterprises, a manufacturer of crankshafts and other components for Dodges and other vehicles, sued Chrysler for using its name. A few years later the Scat Pack disappeared from the Dodge catalog.

Fast forward to August 2013 when Chrysler applied to register the Scat Pack name anew. The US Patent and Trademark Office turned down Chrysler's application, but the automaker proceeded anyway, unveiling new Scat Packs for the Challenger, Charger and Dart at last year's SEMA show.

Now that Chrysler is preparing to reveal a new Scat Pack at SEMA, Scat Enterprises has filed a new lawsuit, demanding that Chrysler stop using the name, turn over all its materials for destruction, and pay the plaintiff damages. Auburn Hills is refusing and refuting Scat's claim, dismissing it as an "opportunistic attempt to hold Chrysler hostage just days before the upcoming SEMA show," noting that it (unlike the plaintiff) only uses the word Scat together with Pack and is responsible for the term's association with its products. We doubt we've heard the last of this one...

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