California may take yet another step forward as the leading edge of US plug-in vehicle adoption. This time, it could be by tweaking the state's new building codes. The Golden State is considering requiring builders of either new homes or new, larger parking lots to install the infrastructure for plug-in vehicle charging systems at the same time, according to The Long Tail Pipe. Similar rules were put into place in Palo Alto last year.

Starting in the 2015-16 fiscal year, developers may be required to install enough juice capacity to eliminate the kind of trenching later required to convert an existing property to be able to host plug-in vehicle charging stations. The hard cost may be as little as $50, and would prevent the expensive electrical upgrades often required for charging-station installations. You can read more about the rules under discussion here.

Earlier this year, state lawmakers passed a bill that would enable commercial and residential tenants to install electric-vehicle charging stations if they pay for the work. Assembly Bill 2565 would make it more difficult for landlords to enforce lease provisions that would forbid tenants from buying and installing plug-in stations. Earlier this month, California's SB 1275, which created a number of incentives designed to get more moderate-income residents to buy plug-in vehicles, was signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown.


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