• Image Credit: AXA
  • Image Credit: AXA
  • Image Credit: AXA
  • Image Credit: AXA
  • Image Credit: AXA
  • Image Credit: AXA
  • Image Credit: AXA
  • Image Credit: AXA
  • Image Credit: AXA
  • Image Credit: AXA
When a Bugatti Veyron crashed on a highway in Austria a few months ago, insurance company AXA estimated the cost of repairs at upwards of $800,000. Of course, there were worries that even after all the repairs the car may never drive quite the same. So rather than try, the insurance company evidently wrote it off and paid the owner the insured value of the car. But now it's got the wrecked Bugatti on its hands, and is looking to offload it.

This early model, built in 2008, has the original version's 987-horsepower 8.0-liter quad-turbo W16 engine, a fixed roof and a blue and black livery – unlike some more recent examples that have adopted a removable roof panel, employed a more powerful 1,184-hp engine and moved away from the original two-tone paint schemes. It's got nearly 20,000 miles on the odometer and would still require the better part of a million bucks to get it running again... at which point it could be worth more in spare parts, which surely don't come cheap from the manufacturer in Molsheim.

Alternatively, with bidding currently hovering around a quarter million, you could just get yourself a brand spankin' new Ferrari 458 Italia, Lamborghini Huracán or McLaren 650S and actually get to drive it without spending eight hundred grand on repairs. But if you were looking to pick up a Veyron on the cheap, regardless of condition, this could be your chance.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 31 Comments
      GianniG
      • 10 Months Ago

      I guess even rich people need a parts car

      jich8chy3chah8wurt2thuk3ghy7ly

      It depends on how much it costs to repair.

      This is where Hagerty Insurance representative would be great to bring in, interview, and discuss. Perhaps a good PODCAST guest? I would like to hear from them. Most high $$$ cars cannot effectively every be 'totaled'...

      DMW2315
      • 10 Months Ago

      Google image "Bugatti crash Austria". 

       

      Sad...

      mike c
      • 10 Months Ago

      Another project for Gas Monkey Garage. A gamble that might have a huge payoff.

      BipDBo
      • 10 Months Ago

      I don't think a working Bugatti should be worth $250K.  I've just never been impressed with the car.  Compared to other, much cheaper, lighter, and more nimble supercars, the Bugatti is a pig around any track that has anything resembling a turn.  Unless you can get access to some track or salt flats where you can approach its top speed, this is basically a drag racer.  For a lot less money, one could buy or build a car that does the quarter mile a whole lot quicker, plus a nice trailer and well appointed, luxurious truck to haul it.

        pavsterrocks
        • 10 Months Ago
        @BipDBo

        It sounds like you've driven one extensively.  Yet somehow, I have a suspicion, that you've never been even close to one.

        jjmoonen
        • 10 Months Ago
        @BipDBo

        Couldn't agree more! The Veyron may be an engineering marvel in its own right, but where can you truly use it? It just isn't a car that makes much sense, especially when introduced to anything other than a long straight stretch of asphalt. I would much rather have one of them there "budget" super cars.  =)

        SundayV
        • 10 Months Ago
        @BipDBo
        if you could afford to buy the Veyron you'd probably have 3 other cars thats does "quarter mile runs" and another two for "track", then one for giggles just to put in that luxurious truck trailer you have.....not to mention though as biased as the Top Gear power lap might be, the versions of Veyron still takes two spots in top 20 amongst others... and obviously its not all straight lines on that test track....
        fabulous71
        • 10 Months Ago
        @BipDBo

        You lost me with "build a car that does a quarter mile a whole lot quicker".

          BipDBo
          • 10 Months Ago
          @fabulous71

          The Veyron does the 1/4 mile in just under 10 seconds, which is incredibly quick for a road car, fastest production car, I believe.  At and drag strip, however, that's just meh.  At a drag strip, even if you ignore the pro-built NHRA funny cars and rail cars, you'll see many garage built classics running much faster than a Veyron, maybe even in the 7s. 

      johnnythemoney
      • 10 Months Ago

      Considering a spare alloy wheel had an price of about $30k, and all of them need to be replaced, plus some body panels, I don't think the estimated cost of repair is that absurd. Price of spare parts aside, on top of that I'd consider repairing this sort of car only at the company's factory, or one of the very few (if there are any that is) authorized shops around the world. That doesn't come cheap either, but then again, there is no point in trying to repair it on the cheap as then the car would be worthless anyway.

        pavsterrocks
        • 10 Months Ago
        @johnnythemoney

        Here is the problem.  Once VW stops making this car, they will stop making spare parts.  But the cars on the street will still get used and will still need engines, transmissions, as well as lots of smaller parts.  I wonder how much just the engine for one of those is worth.  I bet it's only going to be worth more in the future.

          LW
          • 10 Months Ago
          @pavsterrocks

          since most of the parts are custom made, why would it be so hard to custom make any replacement parts, that's assuming every one of the Veyron owners are also out of luck with parts.

          clquake
          • 10 Months Ago
          @pavsterrocks

          Why would they stop making parts? Every manufacturer keeps making parts after production ends, or at least sells the designs/specs/molds so parts can still be made.

      AlfieR
      • 10 Months Ago

      That powertrain tho...

      Revis Goodworth
      • 10 Months Ago

      As it might be prohibitive to rebuild this vehicle (unless you were a rich hobbyist), it is well worth $250k for the parts - most vehicles are worth more as parts than as the whole thing - as a computer rebuilder, there are times when parting out a computer makes more sense than rebuilding it.

      AntBee
      • 10 Months Ago

      Looks like the frame is bent.  I would say this car is for parts only.  I know I wouldn't try to have it fixed, as it wouldn't drive as it should.  The damage looks to extensive.

        LW
        • 10 Months Ago
        @AntBee

        What frame?  The CF tub is not bent.  The suspension arms are easily changeable, which are mounted onto the CF tub.  The front subframe only have things hanging off it.  The rear subframe bolts on also, so worse case, a replacement could be bolted on.

      wat
      • 10 Months Ago
      $800k is definitely a bloated price to repair, considering there doesnt seem to be any intrusion inside the engine bay which is where all the complexity lies. It's probably some specially-trained Bugatti OEM repairman (see: one guy in the world) and is priced accordingly.

      If you owned your own body shop, are confident in your own abilities, and have disposable income, this could be a good steal for even $300k
        Dump
        • 10 Months Ago
        @wat

        Agreed. I'm thinking the current bidders know they can repair all the damages for under $250k & possibly sell the refurb for nearly $1 mln. Unless a current Veyron owner buys the refurb, nobody's really going to be able to tell whether it drives like new or not. 

        Unless the engine, turbos, & trans are wrecked beyond repair - it makes sense to restore the entire vehicle.

      Feurig
      • 10 Months Ago

      You could probably find a rapper to pay $250k to buy it just so they can say they have a Bugatti.

      bored2heck
      • 10 Months Ago

      Do the Bugatti/VW engineers have a non-compete clause? Otherwise the insurance company should just pay a few weeks' salary to someone who understands it and replicate it.

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