You've probably seen your fair share of Ice Bucket Challenge videos online this week, which are meant to raise money to fight amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often called "Lou Gehrig's Disease." Hopefully, you've seen ours. We've watched a lot of these videos, but haven't seen one that makes an alt-fuel point quite like a new video from Toyota.

Julie Hamp, the CCO of Toyota North America, lost a sister-in-law to ALS last year, so for her the cause is personal. Instead of just dumping icy-cold water on her head, Hamp uses water from the FCV fuel cell vehicle parked next to her. Because, of course, a hydrogen fuel cell car emits nothing but water vapor.

Toyota didn't run a lot of hydrogen through the car to collect water, it just got enough to top off the ice bucket. Using the water emissions from a hydrogen vehicle in a creative way is not a new trick. Two years ago, the California Fuel Cell Partnership made the point that you can drink the emissions (just like Mercedes-Benz did earlier this year), but admitted that "fuel cells produce about the same amount of water as gasoline vehicle – about 1/3 cup for a full day of driving." Still, for a good cause, we'll accept the mix of tap water and "emissions."

Check out the video below, if you haven't had enough already.



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  • 44 Comments
      Marco Polo
      • 11 Months Ago
      @ Spec, Of course you are free to criticize Toyota, or anyone else you choose. That's your right. However, what's the point ? Toyota is first ,and foremost, a business ! It's not a moral crusade, or obliged to adhere to any philosophical ideology. It's a business. Toyota invests in those technologies and products it believes will return the maximum profit. Moreover, it's a business competing in a fierce rivalry with others in a very tough marketplace. Just because Toyota doesn't see the world through your ideological prism, doesn't mean it's involved in any dark conspiracy, just that they are in business and you're not.
      Neil Blanchard
      • 11 Months Ago
      Okay fine - how did they collect all that water from the car's tailpipe? They just ran it sitting in place? O-kay ...
        kmiller22kathy
        • 11 Months Ago
        @Neil Blanchard
        Here's how Mercedes collected water in Death Valley CA from their forthcoming Fuel Cell Vehicle: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aj0-eAAmvxk
          Joeviocoe
          • 11 Months Ago
          @kmiller22kathy
          No they needed to bring a hydrogen truck with them into death valley... because there is no way the nearest h2 station could support the fcv so far away
      danfred311
      • 11 Months Ago
      Clever but wont change the outcome of the fuel cell program. Toyota are idiots.
        kmiller22kathy
        • 11 Months Ago
        @danfred311
        danfred311: "Clever but wont change the outcome of the fuel cell program." Oh look it's Miss Cleo in disguise! How do you know what the outcome is when it has barely started? What a hoot. danfred311: "Toyota are idiots" Aside from the irony, you must also include Honda, Hyundai and Mercedes. And you're smarter than the top engineers in all of those companies aren't you. Watch Mercedes Fuel Cell car in Death Valley CA: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aj0-eAAmvxk What is up with these Hydrogen Bashers? I've never seen anything like this in 15 years on the internet. Well maybe the people that believed GW Bush and thought Iraq was a threat, what with their Navy and all...
          danfred311
          • 11 Months Ago
          @kmiller22kathy
          kmiller, yes I am smarter than the relevant decision makers of those companies. A lot. you must be new here because hydrogen has taken a savage beating for a long time. thet automaker's fondness for it is inexplicably stupid. you can google what Elon Musk has said about fuel cells. perhaps you know who he is.
          fairfireman21
          • 11 Months Ago
          @kmiller22kathy
          Might have been more of an impact if they filled the whole bucket, but no they probably only put in a cup or two. Oh at $12 per KG it probably would have cost then $1000 in fuel from a $70,000 car. I would not buy one of these turds if you gave me the money to do it.
          Marco Polo
          • 11 Months Ago
          @kmiller22kathy
          @ danfred311nt here " yes I am smarter than the relevant decision makers of those companies. A lot." You are not a "decision maker" about anything, nor are you relevant about anything ! Elon Musk is entitled to his opinion, because he is both very relevant and a decision maker, but that hasn't prevented you calling him a ''fool" , and claiming Tesla will soon fail for not listening to your absurd rantings. !
      Marco Polo
      • 11 Months Ago
      @ Spec "They need to just start selling them and let the chips fall where they may." Um....Why ? It always surprises me when HFCV opponents, think that Toyota should change it's agenda, just because some guy who would never buy one anyway, demands it. Curiously enough, Toyota will continue to do what it believes is in Toyota's best interests. Toyota produces nearly 10 million vehicles, with a gross profit of over $ 60 billion. Toyota's sales are still increasing each year. Toyota pretty well dominates the Hybrid market, and funds a wide variety of R&D projects, just one of which is HFCV technology. Sometimes, out of enthusiasm, it's possible to lose perspective. There's no urgency, or pressure on corporations like Toyota to hasten any particular technology into full production, until they believe the time is right. Toyota sees it's HFCV investment as just another R&D project. More interesting perhaps, since government(s) are willing to grant substantial subsidies, incentives and investment, along with the potential of competition from European rivals also promoting the technology, but if it all came nothing in the end, ...well, Toyota would just sell off the technologies valuable assets, and move on to other projects. I can understand your frustration, (even sympathise) but in reality, it's a bit pointless, Toyota will pursue it's own agenda regardless of what we think.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 11 Months Ago
      Marco Polo I read that BP is planning to spend $9 Billion on oil/gasoline infrastructure in Australia... What might be the odds they have something in the budget tucked away for hydrogen infrastructure?
      Letstakeawalk
      • 11 Months Ago
      The FCV looks pretty good in that dark color.
      2 wheeled menace
      • 11 Months Ago
      Stupid marketing plot... meet other stupid marketing ploy. Hard hitting advertorial journalism, ABG! keep up the great work!
        Dave D
        • 11 Months Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        No, the ALS challenge is not a stupid marketing ploy. It's for a great cause and if you've ever known someone who you had to watch waste away to nothing you'd know how cruel the disease is and how good the cause is. Having said that...for the hydrogen folks to try and hijack it for some disgusting marketing ploy is sickening and disgusting. DO NOT TRY TO STEAL THE MOMENTUM OF A CHARITY YOU ASSCLOWNS!!! Completely disgusting.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 11 Months Ago
          @Dave D
          I think Dave D is overly sensitive. Many, many other "Ice Challenge" videos have been presented by businesses and organizations, showing their own support for ALS research. Not all of those groups (or certain individuals) have philosophies that I agree with, but I can still appreciate their participation in a charitable cause. Using the FCV's water byproduct is just another novel twist on the theme, as so many others have put their own twist on the challenge. IMHO, Dave D's disgust is completely inappropriate, and counterproductive.
          Joeviocoe
          • 11 Months Ago
          @Dave D
          I think when this whole thing is said and done... this massive awareness campaign will result in a few million dollars extra for ALS research, which may or may not result in any better treatment or a cure for ALS. I personally think that Awareness campaigns like these have diminishing returns and serves primarily to stoke one's ego rather than the cause they proport to support. Or, in this case, to promote an unrelated product. (in Dave D's case, it serves as a hope). I truly wish that Awareness = Money directly, and that Money = Scientific advancement directly too. But it seems that it does not. With all the awareness put forward for things like breast cancer, there have been only modest improvements in the treatment, which would have likely have happened even without all the awareness campaigns. We live in world where erectile dysfunction receives no awareness campaigns, no donations, yet receives lots of private money and fast advancement in the treatment.
          Dave D
          • 11 Months Ago
          @Dave D
          No Marco, I would find it just as distasteful if Musk tried to claim that somehow this was about EVs. I think it shows desperation and very poor taste. And I don't give a flying f*** what you think about it.
          Marco Polo
          • 11 Months Ago
          @Dave D
          @ Joeviocoe I understand your point, sort like those glittering charity functions, in which the wealthy indulge in a great deal of conspicuous consumption to raise money to alleviate "World hunger" ! But, the money raised is only part of the process. The money raised is useful, but so is raising community awareness, reducing prejudice and making philanthropy fashionable. Events such as these are just the most obvious activities to fund the long, unnoticed, often unrecognised, tireless efforts of so many people who give so much of their time to alleviate the suffering of others. Awareness campaigns often help to persuade people to seek early detection, and take part in mass screenings which provides researchers with a greater understanding of causes. IMHO, if these events achieve nothing else but encourage people to believe that involving themselves in causes that help others, is worthwhile, it's still valuable.
          Marco Polo
          • 11 Months Ago
          @Dave D
          @ Dave D I don't think the researchers, or sufferers of "Lou Gehrig's Disease", give a damn about esoteric arguments of how the money is raised, just as long as they receive the funding. In your loud shouting, you seem to have forgotten that the object of the charity is to raise money to aid funding scientific research, not about your dislike of hydrogen technology.
        2 wheeled menace
        • 11 Months Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        .. yeah, this is why i don't post here very often anymore.
          Dave D
          • 11 Months Ago
          @2 wheeled menace
          Sorry, I didn't mean to be harsh to you. I was really more frustrated to see them trying to capitalize on it for their FCV.
      Marco Polo
      • 11 Months Ago
      @ Letstakeawalk BHP is certainly very committed, and it's very understandable. Recent discoveries of massive new oil fields of the coast of West Australia are very good news for an economy, still recovering from the ravages of an incompetent and profligate government. Unlike the new industries, resource based corporations are substantial contributors to the governments revenue base, both at a State and Federal level. With a considerable debt burden, ageing population, rapidly increasing demands on expenditure and declining tax base, the Australian Government(s) are desperate for new revenues. The changing dynamics of 21st century economics, have left most Western governments with few answers, (certainly few politically acceptable ) , so it's easy to understand why governments love the old reliable resource sector.
      DarylMc
      • 11 Months Ago
      http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/breakfast/fuel-security/5278572
      kmiller22kathy
      • 11 Months Ago
      Spec says: "No, it doesn't ever fall apart because they never really launch them. They just sit there in the background as a FUD factor for EVs." Hyundai's FCEV is available for lease right now. Next year Toyota and Honda will sell FCEV's and Mercedes in 2017. You haven't even BEGUN to hear about Hydrogen Fuel Cells. MMW
      DarylMc
      • 11 Months Ago
      Hi Letstakeawalk Thanks for the info. Aside from the exploration what's happening here in Australia is that our major fuel refineries are being closed down and it seems all refined fuels will be imported from Asia. I'm sure I can't be the only person wondering what that will mean for fuel quality and national security. Aside from that I think it's good that BP wants to increase its retail business since they are a more trusted fuel supplier compared to some other lower cost alternatives. I think the chance of anyone building hydrogen infrastructure here is Australia is very remote. There is minimal government support here for EV's and I would be very surprised if they offered anything extra to HFCV's. We are in an even worse situation than the USA with regard to building hydrogen infrastructure since we have no subsidies, our market is so much smaller and the population density is much lower.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 11 Months Ago
      As the owner of an orange tabby, I can confirm PeterScott's comment. The Toyota FCV has challenging aesthetics on a good day, so colors that minimize the strange body lines (like this dark shade) are bound to make it less offensive.
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