In Europe, most EV charging stations don't have a wire permanently attached. Unlike North America, European EV drivers need to carry a cable around with them. This is a bit of a hassle, but it's far easier than pulling up to an EVSE and finding the cable simply cut out. That's what's happening to some Level 2 EVSEs in Canada. We have no idea how widespread this problem is – and we note that this isn't the first we've heard about vandals attacking EV charging stations – but vandalizing charging stations sure seems like a needless setback to the EV community.

Transport Evolved reports that a number of EVSEs in and around Vancouver, BC have had their cords removed recently, likely for the valuable copper inside. The vandals hit the charging stations with bolt cutters and sometimes manage to attack the same station multiple times, since the station owners spend the money to fix the damage. Transport Evolved says that the high price for some of the copper ($4 Canadian per pound) means that stealing one EVSE cable can offer a "tidy profit." Street lights in the area have been targeted as well.

Copper theft is not a problem limited to cool Canadian cites. The American automotive capitol can tell you stories, since Detroit has suffered all sorts of problems because of copper thieves, from potentially worse floods to darkness. Earlier this year, Michigan enacted a new law that puts a $25 limits on metal-for-cash transactions at scrap yards and requires scrap yard owners to mail checks to people selling them oft-stolen items like copper wire.


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