Could the "Zoom Zoom" automaker start making hybrids that go "glug glug glug"? Mazda, known for its fuel-efficient Skyactiv engine line, will be the first Japanese automaker to make a diesel-hybrid vehicle for Japan and Europe.

According to the Yomiuri Shimbun, Mazda may start making its oil-burning hybrids as soon as 2016, and the powertrain may reach fuel efficiency levels of as much as 95 miles per gallon (one the more lenient Japanese driving cycle). That'd make such a vehicle line about 30 percent more fuel-efficient than standard diesels and about eight percent more fuel efficient that the Toyota Prius C compact hybrid (known as the Aqua in Japan). Mazda has been dismissive of hybrid and electric powertrains, instead focusing on Skyactiv technology to maximize fuel efficiency from conventional gas-powered engines.

Diesel powertrains account for about half of the light-duty vehicles sold in Europe each year, while Japan's diesel sales of 76,000 vehicles last year were about three times as many as were sold there in 2012.

In January, Mazda said that it would delay the introduction of its Skyactiv-D diesel engine from what was to be a spring 2014 debut. The reason was to fine-tune the engine's performance/fuel economy balance. Mazda representatives didn't immediately respond to a request for comment from AutoblogGreen about the diesel hybrids.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 2 Comments
      Greg
      • 57 Minutes Ago
      "Mazda has been dismissive of hybrid and electric powertrains, instead focusing on Skyactiv technology to maximize fuel efficiency from conventional gas-powered engines." It would be more accurate to say that Mazda's strategy does not yet call for hybrid & electric powertrains. When they began tackling fuel efficiency several years ago, they knew they didn't have the resources to try everything at once like other automakers. Instead, they figured that the ICE would be the standard for many years to come, and even if you have a hybrid, it's still dependent on the efficiency of the engine. Thus, they took the route to optimize their engines, which they did with SkyActiv. Their next step was to move to electrification of systems, such as electric power steering and I-ELoop. Their next step will be electric propulsion. They currently license tech from Toyota for a hybrid 3 in Japan. They've also been experimenting with a rotary as a range extender. Their final step is full EV. They did produce an all-electric 2, but that was more an R&D effort than an actual product.
      jimmy_james44
      • 57 Minutes Ago
      The problem with diesel is the CFTC, allowing speculators to take Large Positions in Commodities, to drive up the price of diesel. Now that it's more expensive then Premium Gas it makes no sense or cents to buy.