If you've been looking at the seven-figure price tags (plus or minus) on the latest batch of hypercars, and wondering how their manufacturers could possibly charge that much, consider that their predecessors typically traded at well above their list price as it is. The Ferrari Enzo, for example, listed for "only" $650k, but with production limited to 349 units, demand far outstripped supply, driving the mark-up into seven-figures. In fact Enzos are still selling for a million or more at auction. Surely Ferrari deserves a piece of that action itself, at least as much as the speculators... hence the $1.7 million sticker price on its successor LaFerrari.

Here's the thing, though: according to the latest reports, buyers are paying that much again just for the privilege of getting their hands on a LaFerrari. In other words, they're paying double the already sky-high asking price: as much as $3.4 million to put it in the same ballpark as the Lamborghini Veneno (whose production was even more limited) and the latest Legend edition of the Bugatti Veyron Vitesse roadster.

The story gets a bit more sane with its rivals, though: according to the analysis reported by Oracle Finance, the McLaren P1 is commanding "only" a $500k premium over list, and the Porsche 918 Spyder "just" $335k extra. However even less expensive new models from high-end automakers like the Lamborghini Huracán and Porsche Macan are reportedly commanding $50k and $10k premiums, respectively.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 17 Comments
      davebo357
      • 4 Months Ago

      This isn't very surprising.  Hypercars appeal to a demographic whose only use for their fortunes is as a scoresheet amongst their peers.  It's better to be able to say you own a La Ferrari than say you have an extra 3.4 million.  At that point you're probably rounding to the nearest hundred million anyway.

      Nine Elements
      • 4 Months Ago

      Geez.... an extra $1.7 million?  Maybe prospective buyers should just pick up a 288 GTO and an F40 beforehand (or however many other Ferraris you are supposed to own), just to be part of the "considered to buy" list for the original $1.7 M asking price from Ferrari. 

        davebo357
        • 4 Months Ago
        @Nine Elements

        Ferrari really does make this an elite club by requiring you to own specific models before offering to sell you the car.  I mean it works in keeping it elite, but they're only shooting themselves in the foot when they could simply jack up the price and offer it to anyone with the money to pay.

      MONTEGOD7SS
      • 4 Months Ago

      For people who buy these cars $3.4Mil is the same as $1.7Mil.  When you are so wealthy everything in life is basically free, you don't sweat a million or there here and there.  If I had $3.4Mil and HAD to spend it solely on cars, it damn sure wouldn't be a single LaFerrari. 

      Cheetahjab
      • 4 Months Ago

      A fool and his money are soon separated.  

      Dude
      • 4 Months Ago
      I bought my car for $3.4k but $3.4mil? Damn...
      superchan7
      • 4 Months Ago

      This car is an instant classic and rightfully so, but Ferrari may put you on blacklist if they catch you doing this.

      Richard
      • 4 Months Ago

      Yet another sign of an economic peak.  Get ready for thr next recession.....meaning, don't buy property in Orlando or Vegas.....

      Steven J. Ewing
      • 4 Months Ago

      Test

      404 not found
      • 4 Months Ago

      The buyers of these cars are likely making millions per week. So what's another couple mil?

      Ross
      • 4 Months Ago

      For what it's worth, my local Porsche dealership has 918 allocations and would GLADLY take MSRP.

    • Load More Comments