New colors, a free trunk shelf and, uh, an ionizer. Not mind-blowing stuff, but they are some of the goodies available soon to buyers of the Tesla Model S battery-electric sedan. So say the fine folks at Teslarati.

The California-based automaker is offering an Alcantara headliner upgrade for a tidy $1,500 while widening its choice of colors to include a darker metallic grey. Beyond that, there's the case of the trunk "parcel shelf," which was once a $250 add-on but may become standard equipment. Tesla buyers may also have the option of getting an ionizer, which, for those of us that are scientifically challenged, is a feature in which positive and negative ions are emitted to eliminate bacteria from the vehicle. You will be tested on this later.

Tesla is adding these features just as it's coming off yet another record quarter for both sales and production. For the three months ended June 30, Tesla delivered 7,579 vehicles while building a record 8,763 cars. Tesla says it expects to deliver 35,000 vehicles in all of 2014, Tesla said late last month, which means the company's quarterly delivery rate should hit about 10,000 by year-end and then 25,000 by the end of 2015. That means a whole lot of positive and negative electrons. And free trunk shelves.


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  • 18 Comments
      Hal
      • 4 Months Ago
      New colors are an exciting addition. One thing I want to see in future Teslas is electromagnetic cooling.
      me_not_you
      • 4 Months Ago
      For the quiz also remember Alcantara is another word for Italian Ultrasuede.
      Lancelot
      • 4 Months Ago
      LOVE TESLA S, E, X Made in America = #1
        Hal
        • 4 Months Ago
        @Lancelot
        If Tesla got clever they could name the Model 3 with three horizontal lines (taking after their font style): Tesla Model ≡
          paulwesterberg
          • 4 Months Ago
          @Hal
          The problem with using symbols is that teh google ignores symbols in indexes and searches so it would make it slightly more difficult for people to find the information they want.
          paulwesterberg
          • 4 Months Ago
          @Hal
          Slight variation: Tesla Model ≡]
      • 4 Months Ago
      strongly agree with Jforeso below. Really miss not having the blind spot warning which my other cars have.
        bluepongo1
        • 4 Months Ago
        Yeah, it's such a problem to turn your head or add a fish-eye mirror to the stupid * rear-view wind blockers the nanny gov. made Tesla Motors use. *( instead of the standard rear-view cameras which the first generation Roadsters have.) (9_9)
      • 4 Months Ago
      So sick of the haters. Used to listen to people gripe about Apple computers. Now they're products are eveywhere. This is gonna be the same thing....innovation, not stagnation!
      dacelbot
      • 4 Months Ago
      That's good I guess, but we need to hear more about the Model 3! And Tesla needs to release it before the German's, Japanese or Cadillac decide to put out a plug in luxury compact in the $35k range.
        Rento
        • 4 Months Ago
        @dacelbot
        My thoughts too. They tend to be fashionably late which hasn't been a problem.... so far.
      • 4 Months Ago
      When will Tesla offer these safety features: Accident avoidance systems Brake assist Brake assist detects when a driver initiates a panic stop (as opposed to ordinary gradual stops) and applies the brakes to maximum force. In conjunction with anti-lock brakes, the system enables threshold braking without locking up the wheels. Studies have shown that most drivers, even in panic stops, don’t apply the brakes as hard as they could, so Brake Assist intervenes to reach the shortest possible stopping distance. Adaptive cruise control Adaptive cruise uses lasers or radar to keep a constant distance between you and the car ahead, automatically maintaining a safe following distance. Forward-collision avoidance (aka, forward-collision warning or forward collision braking) Forward-collision warning uses cameras, radar or laser (or some combination thereof) to watch for cars ahead and alert the driver if they are approaching too fast or not paying attention. The systems alert the driver with some sort of visual or audible signal or both. Advanced forward-collision braking systems typically use Brake Assist to apply the brakes when an imminent collision is detected. Even basic forward-collision braking systems can stop a car quickly enough to avoid a collision at speed differentials up to 20 mph. At higher closing speeds, the system can’t stop the car in time, but will still apply the brakes to reduce the accident forces and prepare the cabin (seat belts, air bags) for impact. Adaptive cruise control Adaptive cruise uses lasers or radar, such as those used in forward-collision avoidance systems, to keep a constant distance between you and the car ahead, automatically maintaining a safe following distance. The most advanced systems can also accelerate the car after a stop at a traffic light or during a traffic jam, allowing the driver to do little more than watch and steer. Some vehicles equipped with lane keeping assist will also allow the car to stay within the lane markings. Blind-spot warning Using radar or cameras, this system illuminates a light or icon in or adjacent to the outside mirrors to warn that another vehicle is lurking in the lane beside, possibly hidden in your car's blind spot. Many systems also sound an audible warning if you attempt to move over anyway or operate your turn signal indicating that you’re going to. Also effective are outside mirrors with a small convex section for a wide-angle rearward view. Lane departure warning (LDW) This alerts you if your car drives out of its lane without the turn signals activated. Using a camera or lasers to monitor lane markers, the LDW may sound a chime, blink a dashboard telltale, and/or vibrate the steering wheel or seat. High-tech versions can even intervene, using your car’s stability-control system to help prevent you from sideswiping another car. Pedestrian safety Volvo offers an optional pedestrian detection system that uses radar and cameras to detect people in front of the car. At speeds up to 22 mph, it automatically applies the brakes if the driver fails to react in time. Active head restraints Active head restraints move up and forward in a rear crash to cradle the head and absorb energy in an effort to mitigate whiplash injury.
        bluepongo1
        • 4 Months Ago
        When will they be self-driving so people who don't develop adult skills won't be a danger to those who enjoy driving ? (9_9)
      Flying Dalmatian
      • 4 Months Ago
      1) Fire suppression system (automatic) 2) Drivetrains that last for more than 10,000 miles (see Edmunds review) 3) Re-named the "Electric Yugo" after people realize that initial quality is not as important as quality three years later. Actual data on fires per mile driven versus gasoline engined cars would be nice. In addition, half as many articles on the Ford Focus Electric as we see on the Tesla S - and then people will discover that the Tesla Model 3 already exists. Retired Quality Engineer who drives an electric vehicle (not a Tesla)
        bluepongo1
        • 4 Months Ago
        @Flying Dalmatian
        1) & 2) No recalls & edmunds took a Model S on a record breaking cross-country road trip without incident. 3) Most Roadster owners ( without an adgenda.) haven't complaned about quality, same will go for Model S owners ( Who don't want to sell click-bait articles to serve their adgenda. ). 4) If you were an engineer: You could Google that fire info and do the math yourself. 5) I'll guess you are a Ford dealer, since you mentioned an uninspired compliance car you can't get off your lot. 6) The purpose built BEV genie is out of the bottle, the Model X will be here soon to put an end to F.U.D. spreaders that wasted their debunked lies on the previous Tesla vehicles. 7) 30,000+ Tesla owners, the people in their lives and the people whose lives were saved in accidents in Tesla vehicles will never buy anything other than Tesla. Anyone dumb enough to believe you probably wouldn't buy one anyway: just like all the other F.U.D. spreaders who have never seen a Tesla vehicle in person. 8) Ford quality... still funny ....LOL!!!! (9_9)
          bluepongo1
          • 4 Months Ago
          @bluepongo1
          http://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/news/auto-blog/why-teslas-suv-will-crush-the-competition-17073519
        btc909
        • 4 Months Ago
        @Flying Dalmatian
        The "Edmunds Tesla" was an early production model.
        • 4 Months Ago
        @Flying Dalmatian
        What a pile of rubbish. 1. Model S has yet to cause anyone to be hurt due to fires. In fact, gas powered cars kill people on a daily basis and are statistically already proven to be many times more dangerous about fire risk. Overall, Tesla Model S has the highest safety ranking of any car so concern about safety is totally idiotic. What car do you drive? 2. The drivetrain issues of Edmunds are already well covered in the media and if anything, this drivetrain is a masterpiece in simplicity and if you are a quality engineer you should know that every design of a product has a build in reliability which depends on a number of factors. Simply speaking, the Model S drivetrain has much less parts than can break compared to a gas powered car. 3. Model S is a brand new and extremely innovative car platform that should be admired for the actual quality it has reached and with the ongoing improvements from the early shipping cars until today, I'm not sure there are so many concerns left for you to worry about. I've never heard anyone calling it "Electric Yugo". That's dumb dude. If you are afraid of your safety, you need to buy a Model S in fact! Your arguments are laughable.
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