The evolution of automotive marketing has undergone a number of strange phases. Few, though, match the strangeness of the 1930s to 1950s, when automotive marketers turned to cookbooks as a means of promoting their vehicles. Yes, cookbooks. We can't make this stuff up, folks.

This bizarre trend led to General Motors distributing cookbooks under the guise of its then-subsidiary Frigidaire. Ford, meanwhile, offered a compilation of recipes from Ford Credit Employees (shown above). The cookbook-craze wasn't limited to domestic manufacturers, though. As The Detroit News discovered, both Rolls-Royce and Volkswagen got in on the trend, although not until the 1970s.

The News has the full story on this strange bit of marketing. Head over and take a look.


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  • 14 Comments
      peteMT
      • 4 Months Ago

      I've got a Lincoln cookbook from the early 60's that you got when you bought a Continental. 


      Jake
      • 4 Months Ago

      Odd how times have changed.  Now people have $25,000 kitchen remodels and go out to eat most of the time.

        BipDBo
        • 4 Months Ago
        @Jake

        Unless you're like me with 4 kids so going out gets real expensive.  And your wife is a freakin wizard in the kitchen, so going out is really nothing special.  The kids and I always do cleanup and we really only go out occasionally to give the wife a break from cooking.

          BipDBo
          • 4 Months Ago
          @BipDBo

          Yeah, she's a keeper.  She's almost as good in the kitchen as she is... Wait, never mind. I already mentioned that we have 4 kids.

          Larry Litmanen
          • 4 Months Ago
          @BipDBo

          Aw wife who cooks and cooks well. She is a keeper.

      BipDBo
      • 4 Months Ago

      Henry Ford also used to keep his dealerships stocked with his own publication, "The Dearborn Independent" which contained very anti-Semitic political views.

        Ross
        • 4 Months Ago
        @BipDBo

        True, but the evil deeds German automakers have done were much greater... Some things we just have to let go...afterall, 100 years have passed since. 

          BipDBo
          • 4 Months Ago
          @Ross

          Correct.  Henry Ford was a great man and visionary in many respects, but like all, he had some glaring flaws.  he ended his publication when other manufacturers such as GM started offering severe competition and it became evident that the publication was hurting his sales.  In any matter, he has been gone for a long time, and the current Ford leadership doesn't show any signs of anti-Semitism. 
          I tend not to care what businessman or celebrities have for personal political or social views.  Everyone has the right to have views and express them.  If they are using profits for their companies toward social change or campaign contributions, that's a different story and I'll consider it in making the decision whether to buy their product.  If a celebrity expresses any view I don't agree with, I don't really care.  The star's job is to act, and in spare time they have the right to express their views, but they shouldn't expect me to care.  I'll still watch & enjoy the movie.

        Larry Litmanen
        • 4 Months Ago
        @BipDBo

        If you know anything about ethnic makeup of Michigan today that publication would be super popular now with at least two segments of society there.

          BipDBo
          • 4 Months Ago
          @Larry Litmanen

          I must be ignorant.  Who are you accusing of hating Jews?

          Larry Litmanen
          • 4 Months Ago
          @Larry Litmanen

          Immigrants from Gulf in Middle East and certain Urban dwellers.

          Tim
          • 4 Months Ago
          @Larry Litmanen
          Hes referencing the largest Islamic Muslim population in the US.. Michigan. Most specifically Dearborn , 
      CoffeeJones
      • 4 Months Ago

      This sort of thing has been around since motoring began. 
      "Go out and visit a cool restaurant!"
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelin_Guide

      Granted a Three Star Michelin restaurant will likely be in a city, and driving around in Manhattan or Tokyo is an exercise in patience ... but whatever


      See the U-S-A in your Chev-ro-let!

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